Hold the meeting on neutral ground say a conference room and block out at least

Hold the meeting on neutral ground say a conference

This preview shows page 29 - 31 out of 31 pages.

Hold the meeting on neutral ground --say, a conference room-- and block out at least an hour for it (but it may take more than a single meeting, depending on how far you get in the first encounter). Tell the employee about it a day or so in advance, but emphasize that no materials or preparation are needed; this will not be a formal appraisal meeting but a chance to review and revise your working relationship. Start the meeting with an affirmative assertion , a brief “soft- hard” introduction. You affirm the employee’s past and future value to the organization and express your desire for a mutually beneficial outcome to the meeting. But you also honestly describe the current problem as it looks to you and assert that things cannot and will not continue as they are now. Next, engage in leverage questioning , which is an intense and extended inquiry that tests hypotheses you have formulated in the course of developing your picture of the situation. While one aim of such questioning is to find unknown and potentially fruitful areas of agreement, they are also meant to bring differences into the open . In fact, one sign of a failed encounter is the employee managing to get out of the room without expressing a contrary view. Care is needed here. Your goal is to discern in the haze of discontent the fleeting conversational windows that open up new views of the situation or offer opportunities to leverage your employee’s driving passions. Finally, reach some agreement on at least part of the problem.
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Bring your problem employee to the point where he or she can help find a solution--one that plays to the qualities that motivates this employee. o How do these strategies differ from those used for Non- Problem employees? A lot to do with focusing on an array of different outcomes Expectancy theory will yield differences than nicholson’s o What are unintended consequences of these strategies? Not coming to a resolution and having to fire an employee That employee will then take his/her rage and resentment with his former manager to another employee Waste of time and energy for both parties o Are these strategies worthwhile? Yes. Whether a problem is solved or simply resolved, the payoffs to be gained by using this method extend beyond the present situation and the individuals involved. Besides increasing your chances of motivating problem individuals, the method can help you motivate your entire work group. Turning around a problem person boosts everyone’s morale. The benefits across your organization can themselves justify the demand of this method. Yes, it can be time-consuming, difficult, and fraught with risks and setbacks: Although some employees may respond quickly to your approach, others might require time to rebuilt positive relationships with you and their work. But at least they will be heading in the right direction, under their own steam. And in the end, you ideally will have not only a rehabilitated employee but also a healthier, more productive organization.
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  • Spring '13
  • Burke
  • Management, Organizational Behavior , Books, Exam 1, Test Prep, Study Guide, Oldham, Mgmt 3010

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