httpwwwshakespeare onlinecomsonnets Shakespeares Sonnets web site

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Shakespeare's Sonnetsweb site.Wikipedia "Sonnet".Sonnet 75 from Amorettiby Edmund SpenserOne day I wrote her name upon the strand,But came the waves and washed it away:Agayne I wrote it with a second hand,But cam the tyde, and made my paynes his prey."Vayne man," Sayd she, "that doest in vaine assay,
A mortall thing so to immortalize,For I my selve shall lyke to this decay,And eek my name bee wyped out lykewize.""Not so," quod I, "let baser things devize,To dy in dust, but you shall live by fame:My verse your vertues rare shall eternize,And in the heavens wryte your glorious name.Where whenas death shall all the world subdew,Our love shall live, and later life renew."Return to Table of ContentsSonnet 18 from Astrophil and Stellaby Sir Philip SidneyWith what sharp checks I in myself am shent,When into Reason's audit I do go,And by just counts myself a banckrout knowOf all those goods, which heaven to me hath lent;Unable quite to pay even Nature's rent,Which unto it by birthright I do owe;And which is worse, no good excuse can show,But that my wealth I have most idly spent.My youth doth waste, my knowledge brings forth toys,My wit doth strive those passions to defend,Which for reward spoil it with vain annoys.I see my course to lose myself doth bend:I see and yet no greater sorrow takeThen that I lose no more for Stella's sake.Return to Table of ContentsSonnet 18 by William Shakespeare(English Sonnet form with Italian Sonnet argument structure)RhymeShall I compare thee to a summer's day?aThou are more lovely and more temperate:bRough winds do shake the darling buds of May,aAnd summer's lease hath all too short a date.bSometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,cAnd often is his gold complexion dimmed;d
And every fair from fair sometime declines,cBy chance, or nature's changing course, untrimmed.dBut thy eternal summer shall not fade,eNor lose possession of that fair thou owestfNor shall death brag thou wand'rest in his shade,eWhen in eternal lines to time thou grow'st.fSo long as men can breathe or eyes can see,gSo long lives this, and this gives life to thee.gReturn to Table of ContentsSonnet 71 by William ShakespeareNo longer mourn for me when I am deadThan you shall hear the surly sullen bell*Give warning to the world that I am fledFrom this vile world with vilest worms to dwell;Nay, if you read this line, remember notThe hand that writ*it, for I love you so,That in your sweet thoughts would be forgot,*If thinking on me then should make you woe.*O if (I say) you look upon this verse,When I (perhaps) compounded am*with clay,Do not so much as my poor name rehearse,But let your love even with my life decay,Lest the wise world should look into your moan,And mock you with me after I am gone.

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