Pickeri explained even some of the most senior guys

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Pickering for some concrete examples why the system wasn’t working. Pickering explained, “Even some of the most senior guys in the water sports department hide from work. These senior employees know that they will get raises even if they don’t do a good job . . . excuse me, these guys get raises even if they don’t do their job at all.” Pickering did not understand why the locals weren’t taking advantage of the opportunity to get tips. Pickering was making $50 to $100 extra per day on tips alone; when he told his fellow employees this, they laughed and said it wasn’t worth that much to them to have to work so hard. Dowd asked if Pickering had discussed his concerns with any of the managers. Pickering replied that he’d had a few conver- sations with Mawhinney about it but hadn’t been able to find an opportunity to speak with Johnson. The discussion continued until Dowd’s eyes began to grow heavy. He climbed in a dinghy and headed back to the resort. Johnson arrived at the Clubhouse Restaurant just a few minutes past 8 A . M . Dowd had already found his way to the breakfast buffet and sat with a plate full of local fruits and pastries. Johnson seemed rushed and told Dowd that he would have to keep the meeting short. Johnson told Dowd that he did not want to influence NAC2123 Usage permitted only within these parameters otherwise contact [email protected] Taught by Ivan YUNG, Nora Hussin, Colin Cheung, Susanna Ho, Jessie LAM, LAM Levi, Martha Ng & Nicholas Sampson, from 30-Jan-2019 to 31-May-2019. Order ref F346159. Purchased for use on the LABU 2040 - Business Case Analyses, at Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) - Business School. Educational material supplied by The Case Centre Copyright encoded A76HM-JUJ9K-PJMN9I Order reference F346159
west indies yacht club resort: when cultures collide 15 Dowd’s observations by explaining what he thought were the problem areas at the resort. Instead, Johnson would point out departments generating complaints and let Dowd observe without any biases. Dowd realized that this would be difficult because he knew so many of the employees, but it was a role in which Dowd had been successful in the past. Dowd found that getting to the bottom of problems in organizations in the Caribbean often required gaining acceptance by the group, a status that was achieved only through gaining local employees’ trust and establish- ing friendships. It was only then that employees would open up. Johnson wanted Dowd to focus on front desk, food and beverage, and water sports services and indi- cated that the resort’s staff was at Dowd’s service in terms of discussing operations. Johnson finished his coffee, wished Dowd luck, and left. As he watched Johnson walk out the door, Dowd thought, “It’s always so easy to pick out the expatriate down here . . . we always seem in such a hurry.” Dowd finished his breakfast and made his way down the shoreline to meet with Mawhinney, the property manager. He was greeted by Mawhinney at the top of the spiral staircase leading to the administrative offices. Mawhinney told Dowd that he was leaving on his daily rounds and asked Dowd to join him. Mawhinney had

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