According to the study by Rhee Phelps Meyer and Reed 2016 system improvements

According to the study by rhee phelps meyer and reed

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According to the study by Rhee, Phelps, Meyer, and Reed (2016), system improvements were made to the electronic health record at University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center. This included an upgrade to prompt the nurse to check with the physician once a patient has had an indwelling catheter for 24 hours and ask if the catheter can be removed. Within the first year of implementation, the rate of CAUTI was reduced by 56.3%. Within three years of implementation, the CAUTI rate was reduced by 81.5% and a savings exceeding $110,000 each year. The advantages of implementing a system wide notification system in the patient’s electronic health record include reducing CAUTI rates by removing urinary catheters within 24-48 hours of insertion when they are no longer indicated, increased savings by the institution by not having to include free treatments to treat the CAUTI, and increased patient satisfaction because patient’s will not have extended hospital stays as a result of an infection. Disadvantages include nurse’s not having time to contact the physician to follow up on removal of the foley catheter, patient’s refusing to have the catheter removed because of convenience, and physician’s not being responsive to the request to remove the catheter. Once the system change is implemented, based on the studies presented, the facility should experience a decrease in CAUTIs which will result in better patient outcomes and cost savings.
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C128 9 References Clayton, J. L. (2017). Featured article: Indwelling Urinary Catheters: A Pathway to Health Care–Associated Infections. AORN Journal, 105, 446–452. -org.wgu.idm.oclc.org/10.1016/j.aorn.2017.02.013 Durant, D. J. (2017). Nurse-driven protocols and the prevention of catheter-associated urinary tract infections: A systematic review. American Journal of Infection Control,45(12), 1331-1341. doi:10.1016/j.ajic.2017.07.020 Ferguson, A. (2018). Implementing a CAUTI Prevention Program in an Acute Care Hospital Setting. Urologic Nursing, 38(6), 273–302. -org.wgu.idm.oclc.org/10.7257/1053-816X.2018.38.6.273 Galiczewski, J. M., & Shurpin, K. M. (2017). An intervention to improve the catheter associated urinary tract infection rate in a medical intensive care unit: Direct observation of catheter
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C128 10 insertion procedure. Intensive and Critical Care Nursing,40, 26-34. doi:10.1016/j.iccn.2016.12.003 Mizerek, E., & Wolf, L. (2015). Research: To Foley or Not To Foley: Emergency Nurses’ Perceptions of Clinical Decision Making in the Use of Urinary Catheters in the Emergency Department. Journal of Emergency Nursing, 41, 329–334. -org.wgu.idm.oclc.org/10.1016/j.jen.2014.09.009 Rhee, C., Phelps, M. E., Meyer, B., & Reed, W. G. (2016). Viewing Prevention of Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infection as a System: Using Systems Engineering and Human Factors Engineering in a Quality Improvement Project in an Academic Medical Center. The Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety, 42, 447,AP1-461,AP10. (16)42060-X
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  • Summer '17
  • urinary tract infection, Catheter, Urinary catheterization, Foley catheter

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