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19 this was most likely written for a high school

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____19.This wasmost likelywritten fora.high school students.b.local tax payers.c.lawmakers.d.scientists.
____20.Read this line from the passage.Clearly, light pollution is a problem,but state and local governments in theUnited States have taken action toohastily without weighing theconsequences.The underlined phrase is
____21.Based on the passage, you can predict
Read the selection below. Then read each question and choose the best answer. Use the providedanswer sheet to record your answers to the multiple choice questions, and use a separate sheet ofpaper to record your response to open-ended questions.
For the past forty years or so, we have heard much about the accomplishments of the first people to flyin space, orbit the earth, land on the moon, and live and work on a space station. We often receive newsabout the latest photographs from space telescopes and probes sent to explore distant planets. However,there is one aspect of the human exploration of space about which we hear very little, even though itmay eventually become a serious problem for future space missions. This is the phenomenon of spacejunk. Almost every time a rocket or satellite is launched into space, bits and pieces have fallen off orhave been deliberately jettisoned. These rocket pieces now form a vast orbiting array of debris.Tiny particles of debris, no larger than a marble, are estimated to number in the millions! Theseparticles include fragments as small as the chips of paint that flake off rockets because of extreme heatand cold. However, even these minuscule bits of matter can pose a problem because each particle istraveling at about 18,000 miles per hour! They can scratch and damage a space shuttle’s windows,which are generally replaced after each mission for this very reason.Slightly larger pieces of matter, up to the size of a small grapefruit, are estimated to number about100,000. Pieces of even larger debris are so potentially dangerous that the U.S. Space SurveillanceNetwork monitors each and every one of them. By 1998, the network was tracking approximately9,000 such objects and is expecting a huge increase in years to come as more and more satellites arelaunched. The network trackers assign a number to each large piece of space junk, and they know itslocation at all times. If a piece falls to Earth, as all of them eventually will, the network can cross it offthe list. We don’t need to worry much about most of these objects because they burn up from thefriction of reentry into Earth’s atmosphere. However, very large pieces could survive reentry and crashsomewhere on Earth.

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Term
Spring
Professor
N/A
Tags
Farewell to Manzanar, International Space Station, Japanese American internment, RMS Titanic, Light pollution

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