Industrial Characteristics Industrial characteristics affect HR management in

Industrial characteristics industrial characteristics

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Industrial Characteristics Industrial characteristics affect HR management in many ways. For example, industries such as construction, marketing, manufacturing, food, and health sector develop their HR management system. Other areas such as banking, health, and banking must be sensitive to the demands of HR resources since they rely immensely on the skills and capabilities of human resource. Managing Regulatory Issues
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Managing Workplace 7 Organizational HR policies should conform to regulatory issues. Companies must behave in the frame of the law of the land. (Brannick, M. T., Levine, E. L., & Morgeson, 2007), maintain that the firm's policy implementations should adapt to the regulations of the country. The author further asserts that a country's legislation is what structures human resource management practices. Thus, the differences in HR practices in various jurisdictions depend on legislation and regulations. Legislation and policy regulations determine equal employment opportunities, industrial relations, and occupational health. Thus, laws have a direct and indirect influence of HRM policies and decisions. The firm human resource managers must establish important legislation and government regulations on strategic development and training activities. Work Design and Workforce Planning a. Manage Job Design and Job Analysis Job design entails to the detailed systematic attempt to organize job responsibilities and task into a unit of work. The primary goal of job design is to attain a particular organizational objective. Human resource management must integrate the content of the job and the required qualification to meet the demands of the company (Wood, & Wall, 2007). Job design produces highly detailed and specialized job specification that can attract and retain motivated employees. The commonly used strategic job design techniques include work simplification, rotation, and job enlargement. Under job simplification, a particular duty is divided into smaller sub- components and each unit assigned to a specialized workforce (Brannick, M. T., Levine, E. L., & Morgeson, 2007). The method applies where the executives and the HR feel that a particular task is not highly specialized. Job rotation, on the one hand, is the shifting of employees from one job to another. The objective is to allow employees to perform a different task within the post. Rotation prepares employees at junior level for upward movement.
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Managing Workplace 8 Job analysis, on the other hand, entails establishing the features required for satisfactory performance of a particular task. The HR team analyzes the environment in which the job is performed and then develops a job description and specification from the analysis. The job description specifies the work and duties, tools and equipment, titles, occupational hazards relating to the job, and terms and conditions. Job specification entails the competencies necessary to accomplish the task. Such abilities include experience, education, personal attributes, communication, and judgmental skills, and training (Brannick, M. T., Levine, E. L., & Morgeson, 2007). The HRM uses job analysis for personnel searching and selection, training and compensations.
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