The prisoners are us the knowledge we decide to

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ways of Plato's view of knowledge is the prisoners, the cave and everything outside the cave. The prisoners are us, the knowledge we decide to accept and learn as a person. The cave is the knowledge we already know and have learned. And everything outside the cave is the knowledge that's out in the world waiting to be taught or learned. Platos has in mind everyone in society. The prisoners are everyone who chooses to believe in what they see. The prisoners who are unchained are philosopher seeking wisdom and knowledge outside of society. The people walking by are the gods who possess the wisdom of knowledge that we know. The philosophers are the ones leaving the caves to seek the gods for wisdom. 3B. The sun is the strongest, brightest form of light that sheds light onto the world we live in. The more knowledge one has, the closer they get to the light. When he says, “I think, that the sun not only provides visible things with the power to be seen but also with coming to be, growth, and nourishment, although it is not itself coming to be (509b)”. His philosophy provides knowledge but does not guarantee that someone fully understands it. The more light you have, the more knowledge you have, and the closer you get to the sun, the ultimate form of the good. Plato talks about going back and forth from the light and the darkness. The sun is a form of the good which gives off light that the prisoners see. Those who go back into the darkness symbolize how Plato viewed life. That is, the rebirth and reincarnation back into this world as a human being who keeps living until he lives the good life. B1. Plato's view of reality is that where a human is living their life, that is the reality they life in their day-to-day life. The shackled people in the cave knew the shadows to be absolute truth because they knew nothing else. Additionally, Plato believes other humans minds may be able
to form opinions on another person's view of reality based on what they know to be true about life. This is evident when the unchained person in the cave comes back and is met with ridicule because none of the people knew what he had truly experienced, all that they know is the cave. Finally, Plato's view on reality is about true forms, and that how things we see in our every day life are merely a lesser image of the true/ultimate form of an object. We have knowledge of these ideal forms, so in turn we know these items/things to be lesser. B2. Plato's view of knowledge is similar to that of his view on reality. A person living in a cave all of their life might have some knowledge or wisdom about how shadows work, or the true form of a puppet because that is all their know to be true in their life.. Knowledge is something more of recollection, a bit of information that might be stored in our brain that comes out in the form of knowledge. It is more a basis of self-evidence, for example things you know to be true in your mind, or things you might learn in a classroom. Plato's view differs from any other human's view on knowledge because he states that human nature doesn't learn things by experiences, although I feel many people would disagree with this claim. He states rather, that recollection is

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