that the basic interests of the management are protected and also the rights of

That the basic interests of the management are

This preview shows page 10 - 13 out of 16 pages.

that the basic interests of the management are protected and also the rights of the employees. The two sides have a responsibility towards each other. For example, unions should not expect the management to concede on issues which would ultimately impair the company’s ability to stay in business. Likewise, the management must recognize the rights of employees to form unions and to argue for improved wages and working conditions. Collective bargaining infuses democratic principles into the industrial world. Workers participate in decisions that affect their work and work life. Thus, collective bargaining may be viewed as a form of participative management. Code Discipline The code of discipline defines duties and responsibilities of employers and workers. The objectives of the code are:
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1. To ensure that employers and employees recognize each other’s rights and obligations 2. To promote constructive co-operation between the parties concerned at all levels; 3. To secure settlement of disputes and grievances by negotiation, conciliation and voluntary arbitration 4. To eliminate all forms of coercion, intimidation, and violence in industrial relations. 5. To avoid work stoppages; 6. To facilitate the free growth of trade unions; and 7. To maintain discipline in industry Grievance Procedure Grievance procedure is another method of resolving disputes. All labor agreements contain some form of grievance procedure. And if the procedure is followed strictly, any dispute can easily be resolved. In the meanwhile, a grievance may be understood as an employee’s dissatisfaction or feeling of personal injustice relating to his or her employment relationship. A grievance is generally well-defined in a collective-bargaining agreement. It is usually restricted to violations of the terms and conditions of employment. Other conditions which may give rise to a grievance are: l. A violation of law, 2. A violation of the intent of the parties as stipulated during contract negotiations, 3. A violation of company rules, 4. A change in working conditions or past company practices, and 5. A violation of health and/or safety standards. When an employee believes that the labor agreement has been violated, he or she files a grievance. The grievance needs to be ‘resolved according to a set procedure. Grievance procedures generally establish the following: l. How the grievance will be initiated? 2. The number of steps in the process.
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3. Who will represent each party? 4. The specified number of working days within which the grievance must be taken to the next step in the hearing. There may be variations in the procedures followed for resolving employee grievances. Variations may result from such factors as organizational or decision- making structures or size of the plant or the company. Larger organizations do tend to have more formal procedures involving a succession of steps. Some general principles which should guide any procedure are: l. Grievance must be addressed promptly.
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