Other foods also promote higher levels of uric acid such as alcoholic beverages

Other foods also promote higher levels of uric acid

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as steak, organ meats, and seafood. Other foods also promote higher levels of uric acid, such as alcoholic beverages, especially beer, and drinks sweetened with fruit sugar (fructose) (Hammer & McPhee, 2014). Normally, uric acid dissolves in the blood and passes through the kidneys into the urine. But sometimes the body produces too much uric acid or the kidneys excrete too little uric acid. In this case, uric acid can build up, forming sharp, needle-like urate crystals in a joint or surrounding tissue that cause pain, inflammation, and swelling (Hammer & McPhee, 2014). Gout symptoms may come and go, but there are ways to manage symptoms and prevent flares. Treatment for gout usually involves medications. Gout medications can be used to treat acute attacks and prevent future attacks. Medications can also reduce the risk of complications from gout, such as the development of tophi from urate crystal deposits (McCance et al., 2014).
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DB6 3 Medications used to treat acute attacks and prevent future attacks include Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), Colchicine, and corticosteroids. NSAIDs include over-the- counter options such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin IB, others) and naproxen sodium (Aleve), as well as more-powerful prescription NSAIDs such as indomethacin (Indocin) or celecoxib (Celebrex) (Arcangelo et al., 2017). NSAIDs carry risks of stomach pain, bleeding, and ulcers (Arcangelo et al., 2017).
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