she or he wants to change and to work it through and make that change

She or he wants to change and to work it through and

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she or he wants to change, and to work it through and make that change happen.This is an empow- ering experience, although one that may include some discouragements along the way. (140) This is an interesting topic to explore, and Linton does it with nuance in upholding both the enthusiasm and the practical realizations among the Anthropology of Work Review Volume XXXVI, Number 1 © 2015 by the American Anthropological Association. All rights reserved. 39
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student body at UCSD. Just like Jesse – the activist interviewed by Brown in his research on supporters – there was an activist working for One Earth One Justice, a fair trade advocacy group on campus, who put forward the following view to Linton: [We] joke that we are the most aggressive pushers for Fair Trade on this campus, and at the same time we are the most anti-Fair Trade people because we recognize that Fair Trade is just a step forward . . . . But it is ultimately a market based solution. It does not speak to the larger, more structural issues of inequality in a global trade system; it just corrects a few relationships in the chain . . . . It does not ask how or why we claim capitalism is such a great system and that the free market is going to save everyone. If that’s the case, why do we need these movements in which people are working for free to act as a corrective mechanism? (144) These honest reflections are not the usual rumi- nation material for activists, but they are powerful in demonstrating how fair trade perpetuates the eco- nomic machinery which creates large inequalities in the first place. The comments also point to why the image of a simple poor farmer/worker gains so much velocity in the global morality market, drawing in con- scientious consumers and their supporters.The desire to help in settings pervaded by First World guilt can indeed be an empowering experience that will sustain future market-based social justice regimes like fair trade. Linton’s UCSD research illuminates what it takes to be labeled a Fair Trade University, as stipu- lated by the Fairtrade Foundation in the UK, which oversees fair trade school operations. The criteria are as follows: (1) Have set up a Fair Trade School Steering Group; (2) Having written and adopted a whole- school Fair Trade Policy; (3) Are committed to selling, promoting and using Fairtrade products; (4) Learn about Fairtrade issues; (5) Promote and take action for Fairtrade both in school and the wider community. (122) Very evident in these stipulations is a myopic vision of inclusive sustainability. In my own research on university campuses, I often find students completely unaware of the univer- sity’s hiring practices and the collective bargaining rights of its workers (teaching and nonteaching). Many universities in the United States with green labels often do not have unions on campus, and the efforts of such institutions supporting fair trade and worker empowerment elsewhere are ironic, to say the least. I am not sure what the situation is at UCSD with regard to unionization of the staff. If, according to
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  • Spring '16
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  • Keith R. Brown, Fair Trade University

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