hands on approach to business Simpson did not sit behind a desk all day He

Hands on approach to business simpson did not sit

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hands- on approach to business Simpson did not sit behind a desk all day He spent much of his 40 years as director traveling around his territory He traveled to as many trading posts as he could He would arrive without warning and grill his staff if things were not up to his standard He was called the “Little Emperor” because of his small stature and high expectations
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George gets tired… After 40 years in charge of the HBC, Simpson returned to England in 1829 to take a leave of absence He returned a year later, in 1830 with a new wife Frances who was 18 years old (she was his cousin!)
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George’s Two Lives… As was common, George already had a First Nations wife and many Metis children in Canada. He did not want his new English wife to meet them so he shipped them off before the Simpsons arrived
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Frances Simpson When she arrived, Frances announced that she would not socialize with the Metis people She socially isolated herself- a bad move in a community where people had to depend on each other
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More bad news for the Simpsons… Because of Frances’ attitude, George was also isolated from the community and began to become bitter towards his workers In the spring of 1832, their infant son died and he and his wife left Red River and returned to England.
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Simpson returns (again…) Again, Frances and George returned to British North America this time settling in Montreal where the social scene was more to their liking. This occurred after their son died in 1832. George was knighted in 1841 for his service to the HBC He continued to travel across his “empire” until he died in 1860.
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The Red River Resistance- 1870 PAGES 155- 162
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Lots of changes in the 1860’s… Many people immigrated to the Northwest Canada became a dominion (a country that rules itself) The HBC’s fur trade started to decline Many Canadians moved West to find available farm land
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Rupert’s Land:
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The Orange Order Many of the new Canadian settlers were Protestants and members of the Orange Order: A violently anti- French, anti- Catholic movement They were prejudiced against the Metis (surprise!) because they were French, Catholic, and of mixed heritage…
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The Orange Order Although they were small in number, the presence of the Protestants increased tensions in the Red River a lot. One of the first immigrants and Orange Order members was Dr. John Schultz, he opened a general store, took over the newspaper “The NorWester” By the end of the 1860’s he had organized a small group called the Canadian Party which hoped to gain control of the settlement. Dr. John Schultz
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Economic problems… Anger in the Red River between these groups continued to increase. Economic problems in the Red River contributed to rising tensions… Crop failures Decrease in bison Less investment by the HBC
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Land ownership issues… Added to this was the fact that: The Metis never made legal claim to their territory although they had farmed it for years According to HBC policy, all HBC employees were entitled
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