Her first argument examines the birth of our nation

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with a strong sense of professional authority. Her first argument examines the birth of our nation, aiming to arouse a nostalgic sense of patriotism in her audience and centralizes the ideals of American Democracy by using historical examples to compare it to the current struggle of women suffrage. Catt repeats the famous line: “Taxation without representation is tyranny” (Catt), which brings into historical comparison the disfranchisement of the original American colonists and the present lack of representation for women. She then sites other well known political figures who continued this central belief of democracy: Abraham Lincoln said: “Ours is a government of the people, by the people, and for the people” (Catt) and fifty years later Woodrow Wilson proclaimed during the crisis of a nation: “We are fighting for the things which we have always carried nearest to our hearts: for democracy, for the right of those who submit to authority to have a voice in their own government” (Catt). By bringing up these quotes by renowned political figures, Catt is not only backing up her point by using sources probably deemed most credible by her audience but is also subliminally suggesting that if Congress were to pass the amendment they would follow the examples of these two ‘greats’ and be seen favorably in American history as continuing its ideals of democracy. Catt continues her argument by saying: “Not one American has arisen to question their logic in 141 years of our national existence. However, stupidly our country may have evaded the logical application at times, it has never swerved from its devotion to the theory of democracy as expressed by these two axioms” (Catt). Though, Catt points out, our nation has failed to apply the logic of our founding values as expressed by these two political figures it has continued its devotion to these self evident truths, urging congress not to deny this logic but apply it as it should be. Catt continues to use logos in her speech to appeal to her audience’s reasoning and ends with a hypophora: “Is there a single man who can justify such inequality of treatment, such outrageous discrimination? Not one”
(Catt). The effect of a hypophora is that there is a sense that the speaker is having a conversation

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