2 use your pasteur pipette to place a small drop of

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2. Use your Pasteur Pipette to place a small Drop of your Sample onto a Microscope Slide. 3. Place a Cover Slip on the Specimen - Hold the Cover Slip at 45 ° to the Microscope Slide - Touch the Edge of the Water with the Bottom Edge of the Cover Slip (The Water will give Visible Confirmation of Contact by wicking along the Edge.) - Drop the Cover Slip onto the Sample (like closing a Trap Door). Students tend to have a marked Aversion to creating Air Bubbles when making Wet Mounts. In Fact, Air Bubbles can be quite Useful for finding the Plane of Focus for your Specimen. 4. Since you just finished aligning your Microscope, it should still be in Focus for the “P” Slide. - Cyanobacteria are more Three-Dimensional than your flat “P” so you’ll almost certainly have to use the Fine Focus Controls to “touch-up” your Microscope’s Focus. 5. Place your Slides temporarily in your Dissecting Dish (but put them in the Stainless Steel Pitcher before you leave, OK?)
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Lab 3 Page 18 Background for Lab 3 Exercises Introduction to Microscopy (Atlas Section 4) You probably have a Mental Image of Louis Pasteur peering through a Microscope when you think about Microbiology. That’s both Accurate -- Pasteur was one of the Founders of the Science of Microbiology and made considerable use of Microscopy -- and surprisingly Inaccurate -- Pasteur was actually a Chemist and his Best Work did not involve Microscopy. You’re going to discover that an amaziating Amount of Microbiology can be done without the Use of a Microscope. That being said, Microscopy is still Important in Microbiological Research and it’s critically Important in Clinical Research. Your Zeiss Standard Microscope is a $5500, Research-Grade Instrument. Think of it as a Porsche 911 Turbo. Yes, you can plug-in your Zeiss Microscope and look through it and see Bacteria reasonably well -- just like you could probably climb into the Driver’s Seat of a Porsche and figure-out how to drive from Davis to Bodega Bay. However, your Experience will be much less Frustrating, and far more Satisfying and Enjoyable if you understand the Teutonic Philosophy and Engineering that went into the Development of either Machine. A Porsche 911 Turbo is very Different -- purposefully Different -- from a Chevrolet Malibu. There’s a Reason why the Engine is in the Rear and the Cylinders oppose each other and the Ignition Key is on the Left. Likewise, your Zeiss Standard Microscope is very Different from most Teaching Lab Microscopes. Understanding what’s Different is Important. Any Microscope is a Machine for viewing Minute Objects. In the most Basic Sense, the Lenses in a Microscope refract Light in a Manner such that a very small Object placed under the Objective Lens will appear as a Magnified Image when viewed through the Ocular Lens (L= eye) . Your Microscope uses approximately 20 different Lenses to assure that the Image is as Clear and Sharp as possible. These Lenses are grouped into different Components in the Microscope (some of them in Locations that may surprise you). These Components have to be in Optical Alignment to produce that Clear and Sharp Image. The Point of Today’s Lab is to introduce you to Microscope Alignment,
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