Most also favor the creation of hmo based medicare

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Most also favor the creation of HMO-based Medicare options that cover prescription drugs but limit the choice of  doctors.  There's long been a schism in concern about health care costs: Most Americans are dissatisfied with the costs of  the system overall, and apprehensive about their future expenses — but satisfied with their own current costs. 
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
That continues, but the gap may be narrowing. In this poll, 64 percent of insured people remain satisfied with their  own health care costs — a sizable majority, but down from a high of 75 percent in a 1995 ABCNEWS poll. (And  among uninsured people, far fewer — 30 percent — are satisfied with their costs.)  Moreover:     Fifty-nine percent of insured Americans are worried about being able to continue to afford health insurance in  the future (a quarter are "very" worried). This doesn't include those who currently lack health coverage — 17  percent of adults in this survey.     Two-thirds of insured Americans say their health insurance premiums have been going up lately; a third say  they've been rising sharply. Fewer but still a sizable number, 44 percent, say their deductibles and co-pays have  been rising.     Most people don't blame their employer: Among those who have employer-supported plans, just about a  quarter say their employer is paying less of the cost of their coverage. As many say their employer is paying more.    As noted above, 54 percent of Americans are now dissatisfied with the overall quality of health care in this  country, up from 44 percent in 2000. Notably, that includes 52 percent of insured Americans, as well as 67 percent  of those who lack insurance.  Directions and Income Gaps  The structure, fairness and direction of the current system raise concerns as well. Fifty-three percent of privately  insured Americans are worried about losing their insurance because of the loss of a job (three in 10, "very"  worried).  And the ranks of the uninsured — up last year, according to the Census Bureau — prompt some alarm: Eighty  percent (up from 71 percent in 1999) say it's more important to provide health care coverage for all Americans,  even if it means raising taxes, than to hold down taxes but leave some people uncovered.  In terms of the future, 64 percent of Americans think the country is headed toward a system of rationed health  care, in which an increasing number of treatments won't be covered because they're too costly, not essential or  have too little chance of success. And nearly eight in 10 oppose those kinds of restrictions. 
Image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern