Immaturity that makes it difficult for them to

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immaturity that makes it difficult for them to inhibit behaviour Have deficiency in the left hemisphere of their brains that impairs executive function, the ability to plan and regulate behaviour carefully Stimulation-seeking theoryclaims that the thrill seeking and disruptive behaviour of the psychopath serve to increase sensory input and arousal to a more tolerable level Another explanation for psychopathy involves being raised in a dysfunctional family such as having parentsWho are cold and distant (develops unfeeling, detached interpersonal style that conveys a superficial appearance of social involvement but lacks the empathy required for stable, satisfying relationship)Who are inconsistent in their use of rewards and punishments, making it difficult for the child to imitate a stable role model and develop a consistent self-identity Psychopathy describes only a small percentage of offenders as it might be tempting to classify most offenders as psychopaths and explain their offending with that classification but only a small percentage actually areSocial-Psychological Theories of Crime
oFall into two subcategories: control theories and direct learning theoriesoControl theoryassumes that people will behave antisocially unless they learn, through a combination of inner controls and external constraints on behaviour, not to offend.oLearning theorystresses how individuals directly acquire specific criminal behaviours through different forms of learning oControl theories assume that people will behave antisocially unless they are trained not to by othersyoung people are bonded to society at several level; they differ in the degree to which they affected by the opinions and expectations of others, the payoffs they receive for conventional behaviour, and the extent to which they subscribe to the prevailing norms oContainment TheoryExample of control theoryIf society is well integrated has well-defined limits on behaviour, encourages family discipline and supervision, and provides reinforces for positive accomplishments, crime will be contained Is “in-between” view, neither rigidly environmental nor entirely psychological Does not apply to crimes within groups that are organized around their commitment to deviant behaviour oSocialization depends on two kinds of learning. First, operant learningexplains how behaviour is acquired and maintained by its consequences: responses that are followed by rewards are strengthened, whereas responses followed by aversive events are weakenedoBecause of punishment’s ineffectiveness, the restraint of antisocial behaviour ultimately depends on a strong conscience, which develops through classical conditioningoConscience becomes an inner control that deters wrongdoings through the emotions of anxiety and guilt oLearning Theory: Focuses on how criminal behaviour is learned Differential association approachstates that criminal behaviour requires

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