like the Luddites we read about in the Gales of Destruction section where

Like the luddites we read about in the gales of

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like the Luddites we read about in the Gales of Destruction section, where textile workers opposed new technology. Like the Luddites musicians were not necessarily afraid of technology improvement - they were defending their livelihoods.
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Slide 3: Fears grew for musicians as the power of the 4 major recording companies increased. Columbia, RCA Victor, Decca, and Capitol Records controlled the industry now, and transformed music from something artistic to a money making enterprise. These companies were making large profits while musicians slowly lost control of their creations - The existing copyright laws of the time failed to protect them. With mass production of records, and their substitution for live performances, musicians became displaced - also known as “technological unemployment.” Slide 4: AFM aimed to gain more control and restrict the extent of commercial use of records. James Caeser Petrillo became one of the most vocal union leaders seeking to regulate the recording industry. From his perspective when musicians agreed to make records they were putting themselves out of business. Petrillo was based in Chicago as the local union leader Slide 5: - JUMP BACK IN TIME - A FEW THINGS HE DID - In 1935 he succeeded in obtaining an arrangement where all recordings were destroyed after being broadcast once.
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  • Fall '17
  • Communications, Trade union, Record label, James Caeser Petrillo

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