Bak in his research paper Escaping the jaundiced eye Foucauldian Panopticism in

Bak in his research paper escaping the jaundiced eye

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supported by literary analyst, and author John S. Bak, in his research paper ‘“Escaping the jaundiced eye: Foucauldian Panopticism in Charlotte Perkins Gilman's “The Yellow Wallpaper,’” “…By placing her in this room, John, the narrator's husband, resembles the penal officers of the eighteenth-century psychiatric wards or penitentiaries, whose credo Foucault describes: "project the subtle segmentations of discipline onto the confused space of internment, combine it with the methods of analytical distribution proper to power, [and] individualize the excluded . . .”(199)" (39). Although the narrator tries to fight her paranoia, the fact that she felt that she ought to be subservient because of the laid down rules of her time, and marriage made it impossible for her to survive that attack on her mind, perhaps, if her husband, and doctor had taken time to actually
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OLADOSU 4 listen to her instead making assumptions, she might have had a fighting chance against the madness that finally overwhelms her.
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OLADOSU 5 WORKS CITED Bak, John S. "Escaping the Jaundiced Eye: Foucauldian Panopticism in Charlotte Perkins Gilman's `The Yellow Wallpaper" Studies in Short Fiction 31.1 (1994): 39. MasterFILE Elite. Web. 26 Oct. 2015. Johnson, Greg. "Gilman's Gothic Allegory: Rage and Redemption in "The Yellow Wallpaper." Studies in Short Fiction 26.4 (1989): 521-530. MasterFILE Elite. Web. 26 Oct. 2015. Gilman, Charlotte Perkins. “The Yellow Wallpaper.” The Norton Introduction to Literature. 11th ed. Ed. Kelly J. Mays. New York: Norton, 2013. 655-66. Print.
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