{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

Inoculate each by dipping a sterile swab in the

Info iconThis preview shows pages 13–19. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
• Inoculate each by dipping a sterile swab in the culture tube of E coli and then wiping the swab over the entire surface of the agar. • Expose both UV radiation for 5 minutes in the UV box. Without lid With lid From the Virtual Microbiology Classroom on ScienceProfOnline.com
Background image of page 13

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Methods of Microbial Control That We Will Be Examining Physical –H e a t – Ultra Violet Radiation Chemotherapeutic – Antimicrobic drugs, like antibiotics Chemical From the Virtual Microbiology Classroom on ScienceProfOnline.com
Background image of page 14
C. Effect of Antimicrobials Antimicrobics are drugs used in the treatment of infectious disease. Sensitivity disks can show us which antimicrobic will be most effective in controlling an organism. The disks are impregnated with the antibiotic . A nutrient agar plate is uniformly inoculated with bacteria and the disks are placed on the media . You will paint one TSY plate with Staph epi and one with E. coli, and then expose both dishes to the same types of antibiotics. Q: Why are we using Staph vs. E. coli ? Over the incubation period, the antimicrobial diffuses in all directions out from the disk. If the microbe is sensitive to the specific antimicrobial in question, a zone of inhibition (an area without bacterial growth) will occur around the antibiotic. Image: Zones of bacterial inhibition from antibiotic disks, T. Port From the Virtual Microbiology Classroom on ScienceProfOnline.com
Background image of page 15

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Methods of Microbial Control That We Will Be Examining Physical –H e a t –U V Chemotherapeutic – Antimicrobic drugs, like antibiotics Chemical – Bleach & other chemical disinfectants From the Virtual Microbiology Classroom on ScienceProfOnline.com
Background image of page 16
Chemical Microbial Control Chlorine vs. Lysol • The purpose of this part of lab is to compare the effectiveness of chlorine and Lysol in killing bacterial vegetative cells and destroying endospores. • We will compare both the agent and the strength . Image: Lysol on shelf , Bnilsen From the Virtual Microbiology Classroom on ScienceProfOnline.com
Background image of page 17

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chlorine – Mode of Action Used to disinfect water and for cleaning surfaces (e.g. floors, counters) and has proven effective in destroying HIV. Kills microbes by inhibiting enzyme activity and oxidizing cellular contents so that they no longer perform normal metabolic functions. Chlorine reacts with organic materials in the cell and is used up. To be effective, chlorine concentrations must be high enough to allow chlorine to attach to all the organic material present and still have some residual. Lysol (Phenol) – Mode of Action First used by Lister in the mid 1800's to sterilize surgical instruments (aka: carbolic acid).
Background image of page 18
Image of page 19
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

Page13 / 21

Inoculate each by dipping a sterile swab in the culture...

This preview shows document pages 13 - 19. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon bookmark
Ask a homework question - tutors are online