lawmakers also separated the powers of government by creating executive

Lawmakers also separated the powers of government by

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-lawmakers also separated the powers of government by creating executive, legislative, and judicial branches, just as Montesquieu had described.- all state constitutions began with a statement of individual rights. The first of these, the Virginia Declaration of Rights, was adopted in June 1776 as part of Virginia's constitution. It served as a model for other state constitutions and later for the U.S. Bill of Rights.-governments created under the new state constitutions derived their power from the people. However, they were not completely democratic. The states typically limited voting rights to white men whopaid taxes or owned a certain amount of property.Governing Under the Article of Confederation-The national government created under the Articles of Confederation was much weaker than the governments established in the states-The government created under the Articles consisted only of a congress, with members chosen by the states-Congress lacked power to control trade among the states-By 1786, it was clear to many of the nation's leaders that the government formed under the Articles was not working.Convening the Constitutional Convention-On May 25, 1787, the Constitutional Convention began-Delegates from all the states except Rhode Island came together at the Pennsylvania State House in Philadelphia, later known as Independence Hall-The 55 delegates were prominent in American political life-The delegates represented a wide range of personalities and experience
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Kailey Lyson4th hour-During the convention, no one played a greater role than MadisonReaching a Compromise on Representation-The first thing the delegates did was elect George Washington as the convention's presiding officer-Next, the Virginia delegates, who favored a strong national government, put forth a plan for a new constitution. -Under the Virginia Plan, the new government would have a bicameral, or two-house, legislature-bicameral: made up of two houses, as in a bicameral legislature-On June 13, William Patterson of New Jersey introduced an alternative approach-These changes would have created a somewhat more powerful national government witha unicameral, or one-house, legislature in which all states had equal representation.-unicameral: made up of one house, as in a unicameral legislature-Roger Sherman of Connecticut proposed a compromise designed to satisfy both sides. His plan called for a bicameral legislature with a different form of representation in each houseCompromises on Slavery and Commerce-Other issues also divided the delegates. Those from northern states differed sharply with those from southern states on questions of slavery and commerce-These differences over slavery spilled into debates on representation and taxes-In contrast, delegates from the North wanted slaves to be counted for taxation, but not when determining representation-both representation and taxation, a slave was to be counted as three-fifths of all “free persons.”-The Three-Fifths Compromise helped hold the new nation together.
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