The Suffragist The Suffragist was the National Womans Party weekly newsletter

The suffragist the suffragist was the national womans

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The Suffragist The Suffragist was the National Woman's Party weekly newsletter. The Suffragist acted as a voice for the Silent Sentinels throughout their vigil. It covered the Sentinels' progress and included interviews with protesters, reports on President Woodrow Wilson's (non) reaction, and political essays.[1] While the Sentinels were in prison, a few meters wrote about their experiences which were later posted in The Suffragist. "Although The Suffragist was intended for mass circulation, its subscription peaked at just over 20,000 issues in 1917. Further, most copies went to party members, advertisers, branch headquarters, and NWP organizers, which strongly suggests that the suffragists themselves were a key audience of the publication."[2] Banners A Sentinel with a banner The following are examples of banners held by the women:
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"Mr. President, what will you do for woman suffrage?"[2] "Mr. President, how long must women wait for liberty?"[2] "We shall fight for the things which we have always carried nearest our hearts for democracy, for the right of those who submit to authority to have a voice in their own governments."[5] "Democracy Should Begin at Home" "The time has come to conquer or submit, for us there can be but one choice. We have made it." (another quotation from Wilson) "Kaiser Wilson, have you forgotten your sympathy with the poor Germans because they were not self - governed? 20,000,000 American women are not self-governed. Take the beam out of your own eye." (comparing Wilson to Kaiser Wilhelm II of Germany, and to a famous quote of Jesus regarding hypocrisy) "Mr. President, you say liberty is the fundamental demand of the human spirit."[2] "Mr. President, you say we are interested in the United States, politically speaking, in nothing but human liberty."[2] The Sentinels' all wore purple, white, and gold sashes which are the NWP's colors. Their banners were also usually colored this way.[2] Responses The public's responses to the Silent Sentinels were varied. Some people wholeheartedly approved of the work Silent Sentinels were performing. Men and women present at the scene of the White House showed their support for the Sentinels by bringing them hot drinks and hot bricks to stand on. Sometimes, women would even assist in holding up the banners. Other ways of showing support included writing letters praising the Sentinels to The Suffragist and donating money.[6] On the other hand, some disapproved of Silent Sentinels' protests. This included some of the more moderate suffragists. For example, Carrie Chapman Catt- then the leader of the National American Woman Suffrage Association believed that the best way to realize women's suffrage was to gain the vote through individual states first, upon which women could vote for a pro-suffrage majority in Congress. She thus opposed advocating for a national amendment to grant women's suffrage, as the Sentinels did.[3] Members of the National American Woman Suffrage Association feared that pickets would create a backlash from male voters.[6] Anti-suffragists also opposed the Silent Sentinels' protest. Mobs sometimes attempted to deter the
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  • Spring '14
  • AllisonE.Adrian
  • Woodrow Wilson, Suffragette, President Woodrow Wilson

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