consistently and repeatedly deliver the message of change and ensure that

Consistently and repeatedly deliver the message of

This preview shows page 38 - 39 out of 77 pages.

consistently and repeatedly deliver the message of change and ensure that everyone understands the importance of sharing information . Analysts who have been told for years that releasing certain types of information violates the law must now be strongly encouraged to exchange the information with others . The new Director of National Intelligence, Mike McConnell, has made a strong statement to all intelligence professionals with his direction that it is not enough to share intelligence: There is a responsibility to provide it. Earn Public Trust: Abuses of the past have made the public skeptical about the government’s role in personal lives. Yet, the public wants and deserves a collaborative intelligence and law enforcement community effectively working together to prevent another terrorist attack. A Markle Foundation task force7 noted, “For information sharing to succeed, there must be trust.… Building trust requires strong leadership, clear laws and guidelines, and advanced technologies to ensure that information sharing serves important purposes and operates consistently with American values.” The communities must ensure compliance with the law and make the commitment visible to the public. Manage Risk: The intelligence and law enforcement communities have been risk averse in the past regarding sharing information—often for good reasons. Today’s environment calls for a different approach. The risk of sharing information must be balanced against the risk of not “connecting the dots.” What is the true value of having important information—even if it comes from a tenuous source in some cases—if the information is never shared with others who may need it and who may add value to the information? As a first step, local law enforcement should have a formal role and presence within the NCTC. This would give law enforcement officials early warning about terrorist tactics used overseas before the terrorists try to apply them in the United States, and it would help law enforcement plan and train better. Create Clear, Understandable, and Consistent Guidelines: Many current guidelines and policies are complex, confusing, inconsistent, and make sharing information difficult to achieve. This complexity causes delays in sharing data and undermines its utility. People are more apt to give up if the rules are too hard to follow. Eliminate the Construct of “Data Ownership:” The “owners” do not always appreciate why information they control could be significant to others. For sharing to be effective, those who have a broader picture may be the best advocates regarding what needs to be shared. For example, local and state law enforcement, fire, and public health organizations can make a critical contribution in terms of detection, prevention, and response. The federal intelligence or law enforcement communities may not be taking full advantage of these capabilities and skills because they do not have a clear understanding of what they can contribute. These individuals on the “front
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