disdain for rights and the related adherence to a denunciation of reformism and

Disdain for rights and the related adherence to a

This preview shows page 122 - 124 out of 281 pages.

disdain for rights, and the related adherence to a denunciation of reformism and liberalism, should be questioned. Invocations of a romanticized I968, of the nicer cases of armed struggle, or of Seattle may be fine for mobilization: they are not a serious answer to the problems of the contemporary world.
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AT: VTL Always an inherent value to life Coontz 01 (Phyllis, Associate Professor in the Graduate School of Public and International Affairs at the University of Pittsburgh. 2001 (Journey of Community Health Nursing, 18(4). “Transcending the Suffering of AIDS.” JSTOR ) In the 1950s, psychiatrist and theorist Viktor Frankl ( 1963) described an existential theory of purpose and meaning in life . Frankl , a long- time prisoner i n a concentration camp, related several instances of transcendent states that he experienced in the midst of that terrible suffering using his own experiences and observations. He believed that these experiences allowed him and others to maintain their sense of dignity and self- worth. Frankl (1969) claimed that transcendence occurs by giving to others, being open to others and the environment, and coming to accept the reality that some situations are unchangeable. He hypothesized that life always has meaning for the individual; a person can always decide how to face adversity . Therefore, self-transcendence provides meaning and enables the discovery of meaning for a person (Frankl, 1963). Expanding Frankl's work, Reed (1991b) linked self-transcendence with mental health. Through a developmental process individuals gain an increasing understanding of who they are and are able to move out beyond themselves despite the fact that they are experiencing physical and mental pain. This expansion beyond the self occurs through introspection, concern about others and their well-being, and integration of the past and future to strengthen one's present life (Reed, 1991 b). Political action celebrates life May 5 To change the world, to celebrate life, Todd May, Professor of Philosophy at Clemson University, PHILOSOPHY & SOCIAL CRITICISM • vol 31 nos 5–6 • pp. 517–531, 2005, For those among us who seek in philosophy a way to grapple with our lives rather than to solve logical puzzles; for those whose reading and whose writing are not merely appropriate steps toward academic advancement but a struggle to see ourselves and our world in a fresher, clearer light; for those who find nourishment among impassioned ideas and go hungry among empty truths : there is a struggle that is often waged within us . It is a struggle that will be familiar to anyone who has heard in Foucault’s sentences the stammering of a fellow human being struggling to speak in words worth hearing. Why else would we read Foucault?
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