Which event had the greatest impact on the country

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Applied Calculus for the Managerial, Life, and Social Sciences
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Chapter 2 / Exercise 68
Applied Calculus for the Managerial, Life, and Social Sciences
Tan
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Which event had the greatest impact on the country? CRITICAL THINKING 3. HYPOTHESIZING If you had lived in this period and had been accused of being a Communist, what would you have done? Think About: the Hollywood Ten, who refused to answer questions the Rosenbergs, who pleaded the Fifth Amendment 4. ANALYZING MOTIVES Choose one of the following roles: Harry Truman, a member of HUAC, Judge Irving Kaufman, or Joseph McCarthy. As the person you have chosen, explain your motivation for opposing communism. 5. ANALYZING VISUAL SOURCES What does this cartoon suggest about McCarthy’s downfall? At times, the fear of communism seemed to have no limits. In Indiana, pro- fessional wrestlers had to take a loyalty oath. In experiments run by newspapers, pedestrians on the street refused to sign petitions that quoted the Declaration of Independence because they were afraid the ideas were communist. The govern- ment investigated union leaders, librarians, newspaper reporters, and scientists. It seemed that no profession was safe from the hunt for Communists. “I Can’t Do This To Me!” a 1954 Herblock Cartoon, copyright by the Herb Block Foundation Cold War Confilcts 621
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Applied Calculus for the Managerial, Life, and Social Sciences
The document you are viewing contains questions related to this textbook.
Chapter 2 / Exercise 68
Applied Calculus for the Managerial, Life, and Social Sciences
Tan
Expert Verified
One American's Story TAKING NOTES Writer Annie Dillard was one of thousands of children who grew up in the 1950s with the chilling knowledge that nuclear war could obliterate their world in an instant. Dillard recalls practicing what to do in case of a nuclear attack. A P ERSONAL V OICE ANNIE DILLARD At school we had air-raid drills. We took the drills seriously; surely Pittsburgh, which had the nation’s steel, coke, and aluminum, would be the enemy’s fi rst target. . . . When the air-raid siren sounded, our teachers stopped talking and led us to the school basement. There the gym teachers lined us up against the cement walls and steel lockers, and showed us how to lean in and fold our arms over our heads. . . . The teachers stood in the middle of the room, not talking to each other. We tucked against the walls and lockers. . . . We folded our skinny arms over our heads, and raised to the enemy a clatter of gold scarab bracelets and gold bangle bracelets. —An American Childhood The fear of nuclear attack was a direct result of the Cold War. After the Soviet Union developed its atomic bomb, the two superpowers embarked on an arms race that enormously increased both the number and the destructive power of weapons. Brinkmanship Rules U.S. Policy Although air-raid drills were not common until the Eisenhower years (1953–1961), the nuclear arms race began during Truman’s presidency. When the Soviet Union exploded its first atomic bomb in 1949, President Truman had to make a terrible decision—whether to develop an even more horrifying weapon. A father helps his daughter practice getting into a bomb shelter.

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