The hutchinson family new england abolitionists early

This preview shows page 11 - 13 out of 14 pages.

The Hutchinson Family → New England abolitionists. Early Tin Pan Alley: Stephen Foster ; first to request royalties for his work. Charles K. Harris ; commercial approach to music, features a “star performer.” “After The Ball,” 1892. Irving Berlin (writes “Alexander’s Ragtime Band,” but is really TPA) Ragtime: Scott Joplin, composer . “Maple Leaf Rag,” 1899. Interplay of left and right hand. Social Dance: Vernon and Irene Castle ; dance instructors. Popularize social dancing. Vernon breaks down steps. “The Tango,” “The Castle Walk” James Reese Europe ; black musical director for the Castles. Genius of syncopation. “Castle House Rag,” 1914. First black band to sign a record contract in 1913. James P. Johnson . “The Charleston,” 1925. Early Jazz: King Joe Oliver’s Creole Jazz Band . “Dippermouth Blues,” 1923. Louis Armstrong is his apprentice. NOLA composer. Jelly Roll Morton . New Orleans. Pianist, composer. First publicized jazz composition of “Jelly Roll Blues.” Covers “Maple Leaf Rag” in 1938. Claims to be originator of Jazz. Original Dixieland Jass Band . Quintet. “Tiger Rag,” 1918. Also claims to be originator of Jazz (but they were white soooo). First to put jazz on record. Nick LaRocca (lead singer): “jazz is strictly a white man’s magic.” Paul Whiteman. Sweet Jazz. Top Bandleader in 20s: “King of Jazz.” Polished jazz. “Whispering,” 1920. Louis Armstrong . NOLA/Chi. Popularized Jazz. Rags 2 Riches $$$. Cornet/trumpet/vocalist. Golden Age of TPA: Irving Berlin . Songwriter/composer. He a jew. “Alexander’s Ragtime Band,” 1911. “White Christmas” George (composer) and Ira (lyricist) Gershwin. Jewish. “I Got Rhythm” 1930. This song feeds back to Jazz, becomes a standard. TPA, Broadway, Hollywood, Symphony pieces. Many different musical styles and influences.
Gene Austin (singer). “My Blue Heaven,” 1927. Early Crooner. Al Jolson (Vaudeville singer). Belter/theatrical performer. “Rhapsody in Blue” in blackface, 1945. Bing Crosby (singer). “Brother Can You Spare a Dime,” 1932. Crooner. Most famous singer/crooner of his time. Paul Whiteman (considered TPA and Early Jazz because of Sweet Jazz) Blues and Race Records: Robert Johnson (composer). Country Blues. Bessie Smith (composer/performer). A “Blues Queen.” “Empress of the Blues.” “St. Louis Blues,” 1925. Could sing in different styles, gathered a large fan base bc of this. W.C. Handy (composer) Composed “St. Louis Blues,” 1925. Bandleader from AL. Louis Armstrong (cornet/trumpet/vocal soloist) Jazz guy, but does bluesy things too, like “St. Louis Blues,” 1925. Charlie Patton (composer) Country Blues/Delta Blues “originator.” Raspy voice. 12-bar blues. Ralph Peer Record executive that coins, “Race Records” Hillbilly Music Ralph Peer not only coins, “Race Records,” but “Hillbilly Music” as well. Signs every person in this section.

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture