How does prejudice operate in society Why are Hispanics and African Americans

How does prejudice operate in society why are

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- How does prejudice operate in society? - Why are Hispanics and African Americans considered to be minority groups in American society? - Which theory of race focuses mainly on interaction - Which theory of race focuses on political struggle - Which theory of race views race and ethnicity as categories that people use to interpret the world around them? - What are three reasons racism has flourished in the United States? - How did the civil rights movement help minority groups achieve equal rights and opportunities? - According to Castles and Miller, which four trends are likely to characterize migration in the near future? (Acceleration: migration in greater numbers. Diversification: immigrants of different types, as opposed to earlier when it was labor or refugees. Globalization: greater number of countries as both senders and recipients. Feminization: growing number of migrants are women. Expansion of sex tourism, trafficking in women, and “mail order brides” phenomenon.) -What I diaspora? Explain the role diasporas play in preserving ethnic culture in contemporary societies? -What are some of the main reasons there is a large gap in educational attainment between Hispanics and blacks in the United States? -How do Massey and Denton explain the persistence of residential segregation? the problems associated with social class-based explanations of racial inequalities? -Compare and contrast three forms of ethnic conflict. Chapter 16: Education Terms Achievement Gap - Gap in achievement based on intersectionality (mostly race, ethnicity, gender, ability, socioeconomic status) Intelligence - Arbitrarily measured by IQ tests Emotional Intelligence - Identify, assess, and control emotions of oneself or others IQ (intelligence quotient) Hidden Curriculum - Side effect of education, lessons learned that aren’t typically intended Cultural Capital - Advantages that well-to-do parents usually provide their children Tracking - Like math tracks, higher or lower based on assumed similarities in ability or attainment Habitus “acting white” thesis - Black students tend to not do well because they don’t want to be perceived as “acting white” Abstract and concrete attitudes - Abstract: thing you learn from media / people tell you - Concrete: actual experience Cultural Navigators - Draw from home and mainstream culture in a way that allows you succeed (ex. Bilingual) Gender Gap - Difference in success between men and women Stereotype Threat - African American students believe they are being viewed not as individuals but as members as the negatively stereotyped do worse on tests Stereotype Promise - Opposite of stereotype threat. “model minorities” are more confident and do better on test Standardized Testing Information Poverty - No access to information technology

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