A little rubbed on paper gave it a faint rose tinge mingled with alittle brick

A little rubbed on paper gave it a faint rose tinge

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passionate; tearing up thegrass with their bills from rage. A little rubbed on paper gave it a faint rose tinge mingled with alittle brick-red. Asnight came on before we arrived at our journey's end, we slept at amiserable little hovel inhabited by the poorest people. The dress of the Chilian miner is peculiar and rather picturesque. The surface of the fronds is beautifully glossy; and those partsformed where fully exposed to the light, are of a jet black colour,but those shaded under ledges are only grey. d'Orbigny, which can only be called apartridge with regard to its habits. This thoughtlessness, as withsailors, is evidently the result of a similar manner of life. PLATE 66. Igladly accepted his kind offer of allowing me to accompany him. Kilda) all the inhabitants, in the common phraseology, catch acold. Near Fuentes we saw a large flock of guinea-fowl--probably fifty orsixty in number. They were constantly flying on board the vessel when in theharbour; and it was necessary to keep a good look-out to preventthe leather being torn from the rigging, and the meat or game fromthe stern. JANUARY 22, 1833. A never-failing source of pleasure was toascend the little hillock of rock (St. This most beautiful mountain, formed like aperfect cone, and white with snow, stands out in front of theCordillera. Burchell's "Travels" volume2 page 45. PLATE 93. Moreover,the old Bucaniers found this tortoise in greater numbers even thanat present: Wood and Rogers also, in 1708, say that it is theopinion of the Spaniards that it is found nowhere else in thisquarter of the world. of Indian buildings in Cordillera. Their shape is oval,and contracted in the middle by a ring of vibrating curved ciliae. The features inthe scenery of the Andes which struck me most, as contrasted withthe other mountain chains with which I am acquainted, were,--theflat fringes sometimes expanding into narrow plains on each side ofthe valleys,--the bright colours, chiefly red and purple, of theutterly bare and precipitous hills of porphyry, the grand andcontinuous wall-like dikes,--the plainly-divided strata which,where nearly vertical, formed the picturesque and wild centralpinnacles, but where less inclined, composed the great massivemountains on the outskirts of the range,-- and lastly, the smoothconical piles of fine and brightly coloured detritus, which slopedup at a high angle from the base of the mountains, sometimes to aheight of more than 2000 feet.
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