Luke has no ministering angelswhy luke has the devil

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Luke has no ministering angels(Why?)Luke has the devil depart until an opportune time. What is that opportune time?
Satan is not active in Luke’s Gospel after the temptation(ch.4) until chapter 22 when Satan enters into Judas. There is mention of Satan falling from heaven in Luke 10. Is this a defeat, a relocation, a momentary setback for Satan, or an anticipation of future defeat?The ministering angels in Mk. and Mt. in their presentations of Jesus’ temptation, Lukeplaces into the Garden of Gethemani (ch.22) as if to put closure on temptation: “Father if itbe possible, let this cup pass. . .”
Transfiguration: Verse(s) Divine Action Verse(s)Human Reaction 1. 9:28-29 Jesus transfigured 9:32-33 Peter’s reaction offering to buildbooths 2. 9:30-31 Moses and Elijah appear revealing future event in Jerusalem 9:34: Disciples were afraid 3. 9:35 God declares Jesus as “beloved son”9:36 Disciples keep silent Adapted from: In studying parables we have already seen how parables of reversal challenged conventional values. Notice how the story of the anointing challenges standard values:Luke 7:36- 50 “anointing by sinful woman”A. Notice the redactional elements Luke adds to Mark’s version if in fact they are the same story. B. Notice how the author challenges the values of the society in which he lives: 1. The Pharisee invites Jesus to dinner2. The host omits customary amenities for his guest.3. A sinful woman enters and performs lavish acts of hospitality. 4. Simon objects5. Jesus confronts Simon6. Jesus pronounces the woman forgiven. “. . . the narrative withholds important information in #2 until Jesus confronts Simon in #5. Thus the plot in Luke is 1,3,4,5,2,6. By postponing the damaging information the context for evaluating the woman’s actions and Simon’s neglect is deformed. Simon is presented in a favorable light in opening verses: he is the host . . . and the naïve reader. . .is unaware that the Pharisee neglected to greet his guest properly. Simon’s objections to the woman’s presence at themeal and Jesus’ failure to rebuke her appear valid who is aware of the dominant cultural expectations. In other words the narrative invites stock responses from the reader only to overturn and dismantle those familiar expectations at the end. “ (taken from Resseguie, J. Narrative Criticism(Baker 2005), p.35This sort of challenge occurs repeatedly throughout Luke [see appendix at the end of these notes on Lukan challenge ] and other gospels: For which is the greater, one who sits at table, or one who serves? Is it not the one who sits at table? But I am among you as one who serves.(Luke 22:27)
The commonplace assumption is being challenged and replaced with something new.

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