Another challenge i might encounter is the client not

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Another challenge I might encounter is the client not being able to communicate their problem in a clear manner through words. An example of this is, misinterpreting a client who is shouting, “I need food,” and becoming verbally aggressive while crying. The client came into the office for a food voucher to help feed their family for the week, but are so distressed they can only cry and scream for help. A skill to overcome this would be reflective responding. This would help the client express themselves by reflecting back feeling words to be associated with their actions. It is our job to support clients and get their feelings out in the open to know where to begin developing a plan of action (Kirst-Ashman & Hull, 2018). Another skill that would help is providing information. The client may have heard, from a community member, that the office provided canned goods and food vouches; however, she was unaware of how to obtain those items. It would be my job to provide accurate information on how to receive food from the office in a way that the client can understand and shows I respect them. The skills I might be able to excel at are engaging and attentively listening to the client. Being able to engage a client helps build rapport and let the client know the reason for my involvement. For example, if a client presents with a problem, such as being late paying bills, it is my job to be empathetic to the situation and to make the client comfortable enough to explain why they are having trouble with their bills. Engaging the client helps gather information that will build the relationship required to co-facilitate the change the client is seeking in their life (Kirst-Ashman & Hull, 2018). I feel I might do well with attentive listening because it requires being able to take what the client is telling me and breaking it down to understand the meaning of what is being said. If a client comes to me and tries to explain that they don’t know what to do about the drugs they use,
but know they need to connect with someone. By listening and checking in, I would be able to determine that they client wanted to speak with a substance abuse counselor. I would able to focus on the meaning of what the client is saying and not just the words that are being said (Kirst-Ashman & Hull, 2018). References Kirst-Ashman, K.K., & Hull, G.H., Jr. (2018). Understanding generalist practice (8 th ed.). Stamford, CT: Cengage Learning REPLY QUOTE EMAIL AUTHOR Hide 4 replies (2 unread) 29 days ago Peri Ellis RE: Discussion 1 - Week 3 COLLAPSE 26 days ago Elizabeth McDowell RE: Discussion 1 - Week 3 COLLAPSE 25 days ago
Alexis Underwood RE: Discussion 1 - Week 3 COLLAPSE Hello Julian, I agree that it would be a challenge keeping a straight face during conversations where the details are shocking. I have this same problem. When hearing shocking details, I am usually able to control my response and what comes out of my mouth, but I tend to not be able to control my facial expression.

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