What profile does gambling behavior fit variablerationing Variable Ratio VR

What profile does gambling behavior fit

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What profile does gambling behavior fit (variable/rationing) Chapter 6 Definition of memory Mental processes that enable us to acquire, retain, and retrieve information involving three fundamental processes: econding, storage, and retrieval Encoding Process of transforming information into a form that can be used at a later time Recall Process of recovering information stored in memory so that we are consciously aware of it Elaborate rehearsal Rehearsal that involves focusing on the meaning of information to help encode and transfer it into long-term memory Other name for short-term memory Working memory How long short-term memories last 20 seconds What stage of memory is workshop of consciousness Short-Term Memory How to increase length of time you hold short and long-term memories Encoding Long-Term memories. Elaborative rehearsal, which involves focusing on the meaning of information to help encode and transfer it to long-term memory Know difference: procedural/episodic/semantic/explicit memories Episodic – Memories of personally experienced events Procedural – Involve learning a new skill or task until it can be performed automatically Semantic- Includes memories of general knowledge, concepts, facts, and names Explicit- Information or knowledge that can be consciously recollected; also called declarative memory Know semantic model and what it represents: a model that describes units of information in long-term memory as being organized in a complex network of associations. Activating one concept or memory in the network may lead to other associations/memories in the network. Represents the importance of retrieval cues in bringing up long-term memories. Tip of tongue experience: a memory phenomenon that involves the sensation of knowing that specific information is stored in long-term memory, but being temporarily unable to retrieve it. Is a type of retrieval failure, and shows that retrieving information from our memories is not an all-or-nothing process. How multiple choice tests access long-term memory:
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