Realism which developed around midcentury in france

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Realism, which developed around midcentury in France, and, believes in everyday visible and real sights, was greatly influenced by this technological advancement. Some of the traditional painters were rejoiced at the opportunity of being able to see what “real” images looked like, and how to represent them on their canvas. Impressionism, the camera was one of the key forces behind this movement, which started prevailing from around 1860's. The capability of a camera to capture the instant and nebulous expressions/impressions of a scene in a single moment, forced the artists, painters in particular, to dwell upon this aspect of imagery. RE: Realism and Impressionism Professor Clarke-Peterson 8/4/2015 9:56:45 PM
8/7/15, 1:33 PM Topic Print View Page 9 of 14 (NEXT(b08f9b5f392946e1876cd2…r=Ascending&isViewSelected=False&checkedIds=&isPrntVwSortReq=False Class, Brian is onto something here... In the context of looking at the development of Impressionism, I'd like you all to try and think like a painter for a moment. Last week you learned about the 'elements' of art - the nuts and bolts of how to communicate visually (in a very brief sense). After one has mastered those techniques (many who are not involved in art mistakenly believe that these things are a gift from the sky, but it really is a 'skill' that is learned and honed like any other), can you imagine painting as realistically as possible over and over again for the entirety of your career? In the Renaissance, we looked at several fantastic painters who were both artists and scientists. In this case the scientific mind was, for the first time in history, figuring out how to represent the 3 dimensional world (what we see in depth of space) convincingly on a 2 dimensional plane (a canvas). It does actually come down to a formulaic system of geometry and scale – a perfect thing for the scientific mind to explore! Once that was nailed down, artists continued to work in this manner for several hundred years. The invention of the camera gave humanity a means of capturing the world on a 2 dimensional plane very quickly and very accurately. Now here is where I want you all to imagine…if you were a creative individual and had been working with the goal of repeatedly achieving this formulaic system as a means of measuring success, would you be afraid of the camera and its mechanized ability to achieve that goal – and paint even more realistically like the Realists, or would experience a sense of freedom to explore other aspects of your craft and redefine your goals – like the Impressionists? RE: Realism and Impressionism David VanBeuge 8/5/2015 5:55:25 AM For me personally if I were a painter I would refrain from using the camera. If that is your skill and what provides your income then I would feel slighted, since in a way it is taking away from your job. But on the other hand, it also allows for a different type of art to form, it would really depend on how that person felt towards it. Some people might have been in favor of it as some might have been

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