Provide mini lessons and role playing about

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Provide mini lessons and role playing about introductions, a reminder lesson on the purpose of IEPs, and assist stu- dents in completing Introduction page for IEP portfolio (see Figures 1 and 2). Provide a mini lesson on self evaluation, guided discussion, and assistance for students with completing Self Evalua- tion of IEP Goals page for the IEP port- folio (see Figure 1). Provide guided practice and role playing of presenting self evaluations, soliciting other IEP team members’ evaluations,
Figure 3: A student’s perspective on student-led IEPs A Student’s View on Student Led IEPs My name is Amber [last name]. I’m your everyday high school graduate; I like to play on the com- puter, hang out with friends, shop, and express myself. I’m a lot like the peers that I see everyday, except for one thing: I have a learning disability. A non- verbal learning disability, to be exact. I dis- play all of the symptoms: trouble with math, coordination, spatial issues, time management, the whole nine yards. We didn’t even find out that I had a learning disability until I was in middle school; until then my teachers had been very hard on me, and often accused me of just being lazy. I never really understood why I didn’t function like everyone else in my class. When I came to [this] school in 7 th grade, I was immediately confounded by everything: the people, the classes, especially finding my way around. I had trouble with grades, mostly in math and science. I was put in an after school tutoring program by the student services department, and eventually I was placed in a Resource class. Ms. H was able to help me through 7 th grade until I was properly diag- nosed with NLD, after which she turned the curriculum into what would become the most beneficial part of my educational career. In Ms. H’s class, my classmates and I would participate in many differ- ent activities that helped us find out how we could better our experiences and ourselves, a few of them being goal setting, motivation lessons, working with university students, and self advocacy, the pinnacle lesson of which being leading your IEP meetings. You may have already read a basic description of a student-led IEP meeting in Ms. H’s article, but you might ask, “How do I know if it really is that beneficial?” I’ll tell you now, preparing for and leading an IEP meeting is an excellent method of getting students to understand the steps they need to take to prepare themselves for the next level, whatever it may be. And you can trust me, because I’m speaking from experience. The first step to a successful meeting is to make sure to let the student know what an IEP is. Ms H helped us with this with lessons and riddles (“What’s like a pair of jeans that fit you just right?”) that would allow us to see what all an IEP did for us, and why it was so im- portant. The second step is having the student create a script with basic areas, such as a welcome, an introduction, listing their goals, etc. This was an easy thing for me, and I enjoyed working on it. The

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