consider doing a follow up meeting if I felt there was still unfinished

Consider doing a follow up meeting if i felt there

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consider doing a follow up meeting if I felt there was still unfinished business that was not completed by the final session. The reason that I would initiate a follow-up group session is to see how the member are doing. This helps members to gain a more realistic picture of the impact the group has had on them, and also gives the counselor an opportunity to provide additional resources (Corey, 2016). References Corey, G. (2016). Theory and Practice of Group Counseling (9 th ed.). Cengage Learning, Boston MA. Week 5: Saturday, November 3, 2018 What are special considerations around confidentiality within an adolescent/child’s group? How would you approach these in a group of adolescents or children? Legally minors cannot consent to treatment; a parent or guardian would have to consent on the minor’s behalf, though there are some exceptions. Certain states allow minors whom the law deems especially mature, such as those who are married or in the armed services, to consent to treatment, and sometimes minors may consent to treatment for substance abuse or sexually transmitted diseases (Corey, 2016). The law will normally give the parent access to the child's treatment until they become of age. Now form clinical perspective confidentiality is not so clear cut. An important aspect of treatment is autonomy. As a child grows into adolescence and adulthood increases in privacy contributes to a more defined sense of self and therefore a greater sense of autonomy. A paradox thus arises: Good clinical treatment may require what the law generally refuses, privacy. References Corey, G. (2016). Theory and Practice of Group Counseling (9 th ed.). Cengage Learning, Boston MA. Monday, November 5, 2018
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You are leading a group of adolescents referred because of school, behavior, and/or substance use. Describe an opening exercise and a trust-building exercise you might use with this group. Explain your choice. This activity is a great icebreaker. It allows participants to share something about themselves, use their creativity and imagination to come up with a convincing lie and learn interesting things about the other group members. This activity can spark some great discussion and encourage positive social interaction between group members. To lead a group through this activity, instruct all group members to take a few minutes to think about interesting aspects of their life. Give them five minutes or so to write down three “facts” about them, two of which are true and one of which is a lie. Then, have the group members take turns reading their two truths and a lie, and let the other group members guess which ones are true and which one is a lie. References Corey, G. (2016). Theory and Practice of Group Counseling (9 th ed.). Cengage Learning, Boston MA.
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