There will be huge envi ronmental and social costs associated with coal use

There will be huge envi ronmental and social costs

This preview shows page 3 - 5 out of 10 pages.

plants in the energy sector. There will be huge envi- ronmental and social costs associated with coal use patterns in India in the future. If Indian power plants continue to depend on poor subcritical technology like that available in 2010 it will be nearly impossible to achieve the commitments made on GHG reductions in the Intended Nationally Determined Contribution (INDC) to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) in Paris. EmissionsfromtheIndianthermalpowersectorare crucial, due to low operational efficiency. For coal to playanimportantroleinIndia senergysector,theoper- ational efficiency of power plants must be improved significantly to allow them to play a vital role in GHG reduction. In the last decade, thermal power capacity increased rapidly and exponential growth is possible in the next decade. Concurrently, by adopting low- emission coal technology India has been making a great effort to improve operational efficiency, thereby reduc- ing GHGs. It is extremely important, in fact essential, to evaluatethemagnitudeofpast,presentandfutureemis- sions. To our knowledge, the present study is the first of its kind to quantify emission of GHGs for the emerging Indian thermal power sector by evaluating the rapid penetration of transmuting coal technology during the period 2010 2025. This study will also attempt to clar- ify environmental performance with respect to energy security. This will redefine India s part in future emis- sion reductions as per the climate policy discussion in the 21st Session of the Conference of Parties (COP21) to the UNFCCC towards GHG emission reduction pledged by countries across the globe. Activity data and method For the present analysis, activity data have been assem- bled from numerous sources such as government 2
Image of page 3
Environ. Res. Lett. 12 (2017) 105006 450000 400000 350000 300000 250000 200000 150000 100000 50000 0 1971 1981 1991 2001 2010 2015 2025 Year Coal Fired Thermal Power Plants (Capacity) 408203 Capacity in MW 7508 17122 40071 61235 97117 190516 Figure 1. Growth of Indian coal-based thermal power plants in MW (1971–2025). websites, individual power plant sites, government/ ministry/company reports and scientific reports and journals. Some micro-level fuel activity data were also collectedfromvariouspaid-forwebsiteslikeIndiastatas well as free-access sites. The data used show large tem- poral variation, including activity details like the spatial locationofplants,fueltype/size,consumptionpatterns, technology used, etc. It is worth noting here that the preparation of such a multi-year data set is not only a time-consuming but also a painstaking task. Indian coal-fired thermal power plant capacity increased from 7508 MW in 1971 to 190 516 MW in 2015, and will reach 408 203 MW well before 2025, as shown in figure 1 . The spatial location of each power plant is identi- fied and mapped in a GIS environment. The temporal growthofpowerplantcapacitycanbeseenintheimages depicted in figure 2 , where the size of the circles indi- cates power capacity. Here the bigger the circle the higher the capacity, and vice versa. It is clear from figure 2 that the capacity of Indian power plants has doubled in the last 5 years (2010–15) and is expected to expand much more rapidly in the next decade (i.e.
Image of page 4
Image of page 5

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 10 pages?

  • Fall '10
  • BOB
  • Coal

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

Stuck? We have tutors online 24/7 who can help you get unstuck.
A+ icon
Ask Expert Tutors You can ask You can ask You can ask (will expire )
Answers in as fast as 15 minutes