Most parts of the body receive blood from branches of more than one artery and

Most parts of the body receive blood from branches of

This preview shows page 5 - 7 out of 31 pages.

Most parts of the body receive blood from branches of more than one artery, and where two or more arteries  supply the same region, they usually connect. These connections, called  anastomoses  (a-nas -t ō -M Ō -s ē s),  provide alternate routes, called  collateral circulation , for blood to reach a particular organ or tissue.   The myocardium contains many anastomoses that connect branches of a given coronary artery or extend  between branches of different coronary arteries. They provide detours for arterial blood if a main route  becomes obstructed. Thus, heart muscle may receive sufficient oxygen even if one of its coronary arteries is  partially blocked.  After blood passes through the arteries of the coronary circulation, it flows into capillaries, where it delivers  oxygen and nutrients to the heart muscle and collects carbon dioxide and waste, and then moves into coronary veins. Most of the deoxygenated blood from the myocardium drains into a large  vascular sinus  in the  coronary sulcus on the posterior surface of the heart, called the  coronary sinus  (Figure  20.8 b).   vascular sinus  is a thin-walled vein that has no smooth muscle to alter its diameter.  The deoxygenated blood in the coronary sinus empties into the right atrium. The principal tributaries carrying blood into the coronary sinus are the following: Great cardiac  vein  in the  anterior  interventricular sulcus, which  drains the areas of the heart  supplied by the left coronary  artery (left and  right ventricles and left atrium) Middle  cardiac vein  in the posterior  interventricular sulcus, which  drains the areas supplied by the posterior  interventricular branch of the  right coronary  artery (left and  right  ventricles) Small cardiac  vein  in the  coronary  sulcus, which  drains the right atrium and  right ventricle Anterior  cardiac veins which drain the
Image of page 5
right ventricle  and open  directly into  the right atrium When blockage of a coronary artery deprives the heart muscle of oxygen,  reperfusion  (re -per-FY Ū -zhun),  the reestablishment of blood flow, may damage the tissue further.  This surprising effect is due to the formation of oxygen  free radicals  from the reintroduced oxygen.  free radicals are molecules that have an unpaired electron (see Figure  2.3 b). These unstable, highly reactive  molecules cause chain reactions that lead to cellular damage and death. To counter the effects of oxygen free  radicals, body cells produce enzymes that convert free radicals to less reactive substances. Two such enzymes are  superoxide dismutase  (dis-M Ū -t ā
Image of page 6
Image of page 7

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 31 pages?

  • Fall '15
  • infarction, Myocardial ischemia

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture