Activity 23 1 The Adobe Acrobat Reader is an external viewer or application for

Activity 23 1 the adobe acrobat reader is an external

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Activity 2.3 1 The Adobe Acrobat Reader is an external viewer or application for the Portable Document Format (PDF). The Web browser cannot read PDF files — it needs a helper program, the Adobe Acrobat PDF reader. If you do not have the Adobe Acrobat Reader installed on your computer, download it from and install it according to the directions on the website. 2 Some MIME types are registered with IETF in the Internet media type registry. It contains a list of widely used MIME type/file extension pairs. Read this file to see how application/pdf has been registered as an official Internet MIME-type name for the Adobe Portable Document Format:
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Unit 2 13 - types.xhtml#application Explore so that you can identify other common Internet registered MIME types. 3 Open your Web server’s list of MIME types in c:\xampp\apache\conf\mime.types and look for application/pdf . You should see something like this: (Note: If you installed XAMPP in a directory other than c:\ , then please replace c:\ with that directory.) application/pdf pdf When the Web server sees a file with a .pdf file extension it sends application/pdf as the MIME type to the Web browser. 4 Ensure that your Web browser is configured to receive and understand the PDF MIME-type and file extension. Refer to Activity 1.3 in Unit 1 if you are unsure how to check this. 5 Download the latest ABC Books sales brochure ( abc_home.pdf ) from the course website. Store this document in the root directory of your Web server. Now retrieve this document by typing this URL in your browser: Your local Web server is sending the Web browser the application/pdf MIME type. Based on this information, your browser will invoke the Adobe Acrobat Reader in order to display the PDF document. Caches You may not always get the expected results during the exercises with your local Web server and Web browser. For example, when the content of your website has been updated, your browser should display the updated content. If this still does not work correctly, you are experiencing the effects of your Web browser’s cache. A cache is a set of Web documents stored on the Web client’s local disk. Fetching documents from a cache is a lot faster than fetching them from a remote Web server. Caches, as we shall see in Unit 6 , are useful for improving Web server performance and response times. The behaviour of caches can interfere with our experiments and appear to cause errors. Sometimes, when you request a document, you may see an unexpected or ‘old’ version of the document. If this is the case, you are probably viewing an out-of-date version of the document from your browser’s local cache.
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14 COMP S834 Web Server Technology Sometimes the caching mechanism can be overridden by forcing the browser to refetch the document from the Web server. To bypass the local cache select Reload (Chrome).
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  • Spring '18
  • World Wide Web, Web server, Web browser, Hypertext Transfer Protocol

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