h Cash and cash equivalents Cash and cash equivalents comprise cash in hand

H cash and cash equivalents cash and cash equivalents

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(h) Cash and cash equivalents Cash and cash equivalents comprise cash in hand, deposits held at call with banks and highly liquid investments that are readily convertible to known amounts of cash and which are subject to an insignificant risk of changes in value. (i) Inventories Inventories are stated at the lower of cost and net realisable value. Costs incurred in bringing the inventories to their present location and conditions are accounted for as follows: - raw material: purchase costs on weighted average basis - finished goods and work-in-progress: costs of direct materials and labour and a proportion of manufacturing overheads based on normal operating capacity. These costs are assigned on a weighted average basis. Net realisable value is the estimated selling price in the ordinary course of business less estimated costs of completion and the estimated costs necessary to make the sale. (j) Provisions Provisions are recognised when the Group has a present obligation (legal or constructive) as a result of a past event, it is probable that an outflow of economic resources will be required to settle the obligation and the amount of the obligation can be estimated reliably. Provision are reviewed at each reporting date and adjusted to reflect the current best estimate. If it is no longer probable that an outflow of economic resources will be required to settle the obligation, the provision is reversed. If the effect of the time value of money is material, provisions are discounted using a current pre tax rate reflects, where appropriate, the risks specific to the liability. When discounting is used, the increase in the provision due to the passage of the time is recognised as a finance cost.
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39 NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (continued) for the year ended 30 September 2018 3 Significant accounting policies (continued) (k) Fair value measurement Fair value is the price that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date, regardless of whether that price is directly observable or estimated using a valuation technique. The measurement assumes that the transaction takes place either in the principal market or in the absence of a principal market, in the most advantageous market. For non-financial asset, the fair value measurement takes into account a market’s participant’s ability to generate economic benefits by using the asset in its highest and best use or by selling it to another market participant that would use the asset in its highest and best use. For financial reporting purposes, the fair value measurements are analysed into level 1 to level 3 as follows:- Level 1: Inputs are quoted prices (unadjusted) in active markets for identical assets or, liability that the entity can access at the measurement date; Level 2: Inputs are inputs, other than quoted prices included within level 1, that are observable for the asset or liability, either directly or indirectly; and Level 3: Inputs are unobservable inputs for the asset or liability.
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