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IJALEL 6(2):63-72, 201768image is replaced with a ruthless schemer, murderer and yet deceitful.Greville raises questions about the Ottoman's attitudes over their practice in phenomena of conspiracy. He has put hisattitude in the mouth of the Queen of Hungary. The Queen points out that deceit is not seen as a Christian virtue, and forthis reason, according to Roxolana, it is no wonder that the Hungarian monarch was killed and his infant heir wasimprisoned, and that “Christian Kings live not in Courts but Cells” (2. 78) for not resorting to deceit when necessaryonly show but “ill-bred Innocence” (2. 78). She should know her story is one of survival, and ethics are also questionedby her. Roxolana points out to the virtuous Hungarian Queen, that deceit is necessary for survival, and not based onselfish endeavours but it is based on ambition, so she advises the Queen of Hungary to take on false appearances for thecause of her safety and her son’s, as well as for the cause of her disintegrating nation. These two women are united asfaithful, strong and courageous mothers, and in no point does the play demoralize or overthrow their positions. Theycome through as mothers who hug their domestic roles as caregivers and do what they have to do for continuedexistence. And in this play it is Roxolana who laments this custom of violence—the historical Roxolana who wasthought to have prompted the very custom and endorsed it. Here is her grief:Oh cruel Empire! That does thus ordainOf Royal Race the youngest to be slain,That so the eldest may securely reign;Making the ‘Imperial Mother ever mournFor all her Infants in Succession born. (2. 76)She puts in that the imperial Turkish tradition is nothing but “Of fatal strife, where Victors nothing gain” (2.2.76) andsome, who had killed their sons, more tears did shed for their own guilt, than that their sons were dead: Guilt wroughtby Fate, which had the valour mov’d/ Against that Prince whom they for valor lov’d. (2.110).Roxolana is malevolence as Shakespeare's Iago inOthellowith a far cry from the static Lady-Macbeth-like (Almas,2009:143) Roxolana evokes the female villains. While Greville's Roxolana is extreme of evil, manipulating the king andplotting his downfall, monstrous in part precisely because she is a woman, she is also a vehicle of political andphilosophical commentary. InMustapha, Roxolana designs to "alter Empire, and Succession" (Greville,Mustapha,1990: 155), by convincing Soliman that his son Mustapha, is guilty of treachery, thus making her own son successor tothe Ottoman monarchy.The Sultan's investigation about the treason of his son is weak and not independent. He concluded with the accusationthat Mustapha has a drastic ambition to overthrow him and forget the natural parental ties. Soliman thinks that his son isopting for a coup d'état as did his grandfather Selim. Soliman has to make an emergency action to save his reputation asa super monarch. Therefore, he over-reads the political situation with his son treachery that his European and Persianfoes might storm Turkish towns. He thinks that the Turkish army will perform less since it is in the hand of Mustapha.

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Term
Fall
Professor
Prof.Dr.Zazaİrunıj
Tags
Ottoman Empire, Sultan Soliman, Prince Mustapha

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