Although valid examples are used when describing the Matthew Effect Gladwell

Although valid examples are used when describing the

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Although valid examples are used when describing the Matthew Effect, Gladwell oversimplifies the importance of practice by undermining the importance of talent in describing the 10,000 rule which he believes is the perfect amount of hours of practice to complete in order for people to succeed on their profession. Gardner criticizes Gladwell’s downplaying of the prominence of talent in succeeding. He says, “Gladwell places the nature of talent inside a lock box, conceding its importance but making no effort to explain what it is or how it emerges.” (Gardner 2) Gardner suggests that Gladwell does yield to the fact that talent plays a role in succeeding, however does nothing to further explain its complexion. In “Outliers”, Gladwell illustrates the life of Bill Joy, Bill Gates and the Beatles, calling them “undeniably talented”. However, Gladwell then immediately shifts to state that talent is not what got them far, saying,
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Lin 4 “But what truly distinguishes their histories is not their extraordinary talent but their extraordinary opportunities.” (Gladwell 55) Gladwell definitely realizes that talent does play a role in Joy, Gates and the Beatles’ success, yet he fails to recognize and illustrate it. Intentionally or not, he instead shifts his readers’ attention, by emphasizing how much practice Joy, Gates and the Beatles put in their respective profession. By doing so, he is oversimplifying the importance of practice and its role in succeeding and underestimating the role talent plays in aiding one’s success. In addition to trivializing the importance of talent, Gladwell also uses an exceptionally frequent instances of using the ambiguous pronoun ‘we’, which greatly oversimplifies the opinion of the majority. One example out of Gladwell’s countless misrepresentation of the public is when he presents the public’s understanding of success. He says, “we cling to the idea that success is a simple function of individual merit and that the world in which we all grow up and the rules we choose to write as a society don’t matter at all.” (Gladwell 33) He states that the
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  • Spring '11
  • habor
  • English, Malcolm Gladwell, author Malcolm Gladwell

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