3 discussing your ideas with others find out how

Info icon This preview shows pages 6–8. Sign up to view the full content.

3. Discussing your ideas with others: Find out how other people have approached similar  problems. 4. Researching your options: Look for hidden advantages and flaws. What has been tried  and failed before? 5. Evaluating and costing options: Can you afford them? Do you have the right resources for  each? 6. Checking your expertise: Do you have the right expertise and skills? Could you develop  these in time? 7. Giving your mind time to 'play' with and mull over different options. c) Evaluating the process In evaluating your decision, consider the following: How well did it work? What would have led to a better outcome? What else needs to be done? How far have you met deadlines and budgets (where relevant). How far did the solution meet the task requirements or the needs of the client? What feedback have you received from others? What does this tell you about your  performance? d)  Writing up and presenting the problem Usually, beneficiaries from the problem to be solved will need to understand and know how you  arrived at the solution you adopted. In elaborating the approach, present clearly:
Image of page 6

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

How you defined the problem. The parameters of the problem (i.e. the time available, the cost, available resources,  expertise, the nature of the brief). The solutions that you considered with their advantages, disadvantages and interesting  features. How you arrived at the decision you took. Your method for applying the solution and what you did. The results. An evaluation a)  Decision Making styles Besides the attention given to decision rationality, another approach to behavioral decision making  focuses on the styles that managers use in choosing among alternatives. For instance, one decision- style typology using well-known managers as representative examples identified the following: 1. Charismatics  (enthusiastic, captivating, talkative, dominant): Virgin Atlantic’s Richard  Branson or Southwest Airlines’ founder Herb Kelleher; 2. Thinkers  (cerebral, intelligent, logical, academic): Dell Computer’s Michael Dell or  Microsoft’s Bill Gates; 3. Skeptics   (demanding, disruptive, disagreeable, rebellious): Steve Case of AOL-Time  Warner or Tom Siebel of the software developer Siebel Systems; 4. Followers  (responsible, cautious, brand-driven, bargain-conscious): Peter Coors of Coors Brewery or former Hewlett-Packard head Carly Fiorina; and 5. Controllers   (logical, unemotional, sensible, detail oriented, accurate, analytical): Ford’s  former CEO Jacques Nasser or Martha Stewart, Omnimedia).
Image of page 7
Image of page 8
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern