Retrieved from ways technology helps

This preview shows page 4 - 6 out of 6 pages.

Retrieved from - tackle-low-literacy-rates . DQ 3.2 Reading aloud and monitoring is a simple but effective creative way teachers can integrate discussion in the classroom. Reading aloud is considered to be an elementary school method, but middle and high classrooms can benefit from this method as well. While reading aloud, this gives teachers the chance to model good reading behavior. When reading aloud, it is important to stop and check for comprehension. This promotes classroom discussions as well. According to Fountas & Pinnell, teachers can demonstrate their own think-aloud or interactive elements and focus intentionally on the meaning “within the text,” “about the text,” and “beyond the text” (2006). These interactive elements can push students for deeper thought around a big idea. Discussions after reading aloud can support conversations in class that help students make critical connections. Another creative way I promoting cooperative talk. This can be done by just making periodical stops in the reading, and have the students turn to discuss what just been revealed in the reading and any issues with comprehension. This is a useful strategy that can be used after a read-aloud when all students have a shared experience in listening to a text. Promoting cooperative talk also aids in the teacher reinforcing what is being taught. This is a cooperative learning method that students gain the knowledge of reading strategies reciprocally. This method is a powerful instructional tool. References Fountas, I., & Pinnell, G. S. (2006). Teaching for Comprehending and Fluency: Thinking, Talking, and Writing about Reading, K–8. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.
Pinnell, G. S. & Fountas, I. (2009). When readers struggle: Teaching that works. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann DQ 4.1 Class, When I think quantitative and qualitive methods/meaures as it relates to education, I think about methods of evaluating students. Quantitative (measurable) Methods of Evaluation: are basically the "What you learned?" in which examples of this would be questionaires, revision questions, quizzes and etc. The importance of the assignment itself can also influence the reading activity. Skimming a book or article for a key piece of information or reading leisurely places less demand on the reading task than if a student is preparing for an exam, assembling a piece of equipment, or reading for long-term retention. Whereas qualitative methods of evaluations are the "How can you apply, synthesize, evaluate, and design what you have learned." This method examines text attributes that can only be evaluated by the person who is reading the book or passage. For example, essays, focus groups, scenarios, projects, case studies, artefacts, personal experiences, introspection, visual texts, portfolios, direct observation, role play or simulation, and so on.

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture