Please remove the immersion oil from the 100x lens

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- Please remove the Immersion Oil from the 100X Lens - Please wrap the Cord around your Microscope “Lariat Style” (“High-Ho, Silver! Away!”) -- or like your Vacuum Cleaner if you don’t feel at Home on the Range -- and return it to its Reserved Spot in the Microscope Cabinet • Please wipe-down your Bench Top with Bacdown before you leave - And please don’t forget to wash your Hands
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Lab 3 Page 4 Lab 3 Exercises Zeiss Standard Microscope Nomenclature (L= to call [a] name) 1. Lamp Rheostat Control (G= flow control) (On the back Left of the Base) This works just like a Dining Room Dimmer Switch. Turn this Control down and click it to “Off” before you do anything else. The Student who used the Microscope before you may have had the Lamp turned up to Levels that can vividly simulate the Effects of a Nuclear Blast. The Lamp Rheostat Control also functions as an “On/Off” Switch. But it won’t do anything until your Microscope is plugged-in. 2. Field Diaphragm Control (Ribbed Plastic Ring near the Zeiss Logo) Turning this Audi TT-esque Control opens and closes the Field Diaphragm. It has an embossed 1-20 Scale that’s really hard to read. 3. Fine and Coarse Focus Knobs Don’t use the Coarse Focus Knob while looking at a Specimen. You should be watching the Objective Lens from the Side to be sure you don’t ram it through a Slide. The Fine Focus Knob should operate with Teutonic Precision. If you encounter any Resistance, your Objective Lens is probably pressing against the Slide. 4. Condenser Controls 4A. Condenser Focus Knob (Black Plastic Knob on the lower left) Use this Knob to raise and lower the entire Condenser. 4B. Condenser Auxiliary Lens Lever (Silver Knob on the Right) You turn (“twist”) this guy like you twist the Turn Signal Lever on most Cars to turn on the Headlights. Turning this guy moves the Condenser Auxiliary (L= help) Lens into and out of Place. It should always be in Place except when you’re using the 3.2 X Red Lens. It’s a Good Idea to check that this guy is fully “UP”. If it has been moved even a little bit it can seriously screw-up your Alignment. 4C. Condenser Centering Screws (Silver Knobs in front, either side) Turning these Screws physically moves the entire Condenser Lens Assembly. Using these Screws feels like using an Etch-A-Sketch. 4D. Condenser Diaphragm Control (Ninja Black Metal Lever) This flat, metal Lever opens and closes the Condenser Diaphragm.
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Lab 3 Page 5 5. Mechanical Stage Control s (Black Plastic Knobs to the lower Left) These look like black, vertical Versions of the Coarse and Fine Focus Knobs. The Stage is marked with X and Y Coordinates. If you spot something interesting, jot down the Coordinates and return to this same Area on this Slide later on. 6. R otating Lens Turret There are four different Objective Lenses attached to this rotating Turret: 3,2X Red Ring (Germans use a Comma as a Decimal Point) 10X Yellow Ring 40 X Blue Ring 100 X White Ring and Black Ring You turn the Lens Turret by turning a textured Black Rubber Collar with
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