He hated Mary from the moment he met her because she blindly made him feel

He hated mary from the moment he met her because she

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He hated Mary from the moment he met her, because she blindly made him feel uncomfortable in his own skin, regardless of her intentions of inclusiveness. Through his
DeGarmo 4 job with the Daltons, Bigger drives Mary and her beau around town one night and can’t bring himself to accept the way that they treat him; his thoughts wander, “he did not understand them; he distrusted them, really hated them. He was puzzled as to why they were treating him this way” (Wright 71). Because Bigger feels such a heated abhorrence towards Mary, he shows little remorse in her death, if any at all. In response to the repercussions of Mary’s death, Bigger says, “I felt like she was killing me, so I didn’t care” (Wright 356). The white people that are against Bigger in his prosecution recognize the statement against them that is established by his murders. For example, Mr. Max (Bigger’s lawyer) observes, “They felt they had you fenced off so you could not do what you did. Now they're mad because deep down in them they believe that they made you do it” (Wright 358). From a position of weakness, Bigger faces his oppressors head on in lashing out against them. And regardless of his objective, he forces the public to address the issue of segregation and subjugation. At the expense of his own life, Bigger delivers to a greater cause through the murders of Mary and Bessie, which rings out as heroism. In opposing his putative inferiority to the white race, he fights through all struggles and unexpectedly thrusts the spotlight on the biggest of issues at hand, being racial oppression. Bigger finally finds meaning in his life—which every human being deserves—through undoubtedly heroic actions.

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