This time engage more actively with the people around

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This time, engage more actively with the people around you. Talking to people is a key part of participant observation. Learn from them. Find out what they're doing and why. Ask questions that you think might help you better answer your research question. When you approach someone, briefly explain to them that you're working on a class project and that you would like to ask them a few questions. Anthropologists always make it clear to the people that they're working with that they're conducting research. People will not necessarily behave the same way once they know someone is conducting research. This is okay! Anthropologists don't work in a controlled setting like a lab: researching human life involves interaction, which means some people may choose not to take part. It's important that anthropologists acknowledge how their presence affects things. It's also crucial that anthropologists are specifically aware of how aspects of their identity (e.g. their gender, age, etc.) might affect how people interact with them. Anthropologists also need to be aware of how their identity shapes their own interpretation of the data they collect. The term for this awareness is reflexivity. Taking Field Notes Take field notes while do you your activity, or immediately after completing the activity. You can use the same method as you did previous, if the way seemed effective to you. Alternately, try some new approaches to taking notes. Succeeding in your Participant Observation Here are some questions that may help guide your second hour of participant observation: How is what you're observing this time different from what you noticed during your first hour of participant observation? Why are the people around you participating in this activity? What's its significance to them? You can ask them these questions directly. How might your presence be affecting other people? What is your relationship to them? How might aspects of your identity shape the ways that you're interacting with other people? How might your own identity shape how you interpret what's going on? Be reflexive. How does what you're learning help you answer your research question? What new ideas do you have this time, versus during your first hour of participant observation? What else do you notice? Write down anything that seems interesting or important. You have two options for submitting your field notes: You can type your notes into the space below and upload your journal to the Canvas assignment for Journal 2.4 (doc, docx, PDF) OR you can submit a photo or scan (pdf, jpg, jpeg, png, tiff) of your handwritten notes to the Canvas assignment for Journal 2.4. DUE DATE: This assignment needs to be completed by 11:59pm the day BEFORE your Discussion Section in Week 7 .

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