Koreas.Dynamic.Role.In.East.Asia.Interaction.Innovation.And.Diffusion_Paoloni_Sholler_Velez.pdf

Exploring the environment korean enigma the unified

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Exploring the Environment: Korean Enigma. The Unified Silla. Retrieved on August 15, 2010 from http://www.cotf.edu/ete/modules/korea/kshilparh.html KBS World website sponsored by the Korean Communications Commission- for Korean Artwork: retrieved on July 28, 2010 from: http://world.kbs.co.kr/english/korea/korea_history_con53.htm “Korea Summer Fellowship 2010.” Face book. Created by Jamie Paoloni, 2010. Retrieved on August 16, 2010 from Lee Ji-seon, et al., ed. King Sejong the Great. Seoul, Korean Spirit and Culture Promotion Project, 2006. Lee Ji-seon, et al., ed. Fifty Wonders of Korea. Seoul, Korean Spirit and Culture Promotion Project, 2007. Lew, Young Ick. Brief History of Korea: A Birdseye View. The Korea Society, 2000. Lonely Planet. South Korea: Shilla Ascendancy. 2010. Retrieved on July 25, 2010 from http://www.lonelyplanet.com/south-korea/history#773286 Nahm, Andrew C. A Panorama of 5,000 Years: Korean History. Seoul, Hollym Corporation, 1989. New World Encyclopedia. Goryeo Dynasty (Korea) . 2008. Retrieved on August 10, 2010 from http://www.newworldencyclopedia.org/entry/Goryeo Savada, Andrea Matles and Shaw, William ed. South Korea: A Country Study . Washington, Library of Congress, 1990. Retrieved on August 12, 2010 from http://countrystudies.us/south-korea/4.htm and http://countrystudies.us/south-korea/6.htm The Academy of Korean Studies. Exploring Korean History Through World Heritage. The Academy of Korean Studies, 2006. The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Golden Treasures: The Royal Tombs of Silla. 2010. Retrieved on July 25, 2010 from http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/sila/hd_sila.htm Nahm, Andrew C. A Panorama of 5,000 Years: Korean History. Seoul, Hollym Corporation, 1989.
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HANDOUT 1: EAST ASIA MAP ACTIVITY Directions: On the maps below, clearly identify the items listed for each. Use color, shading, and a key where appropriate to make your maps easily readable. Use your textbook, as well as the following websites to complete this task. http://www.silkroadproject.org/tabid/177/defaul.aspx http://www.cotf.edu/ete/modules/korea/kdivided.html As you complete ‘map 1,’ consider the following questions: 1. How did the Silk Road impact China? 2. How could the Silk Road have impacted Korea? 3. What role could Korea have played in Silk Road trade? Map 1 items: China Pacific Ocean East Sea (Sea of Japan) Silk Road Tributary Korean Peninsula Indian Ocean Gobi Desert route Japan East China Sea Himalayas Mongolia Yellow Sea Main Silk Road Map 1: East Asia/Silk Rod
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HANDOUT 2: THE THREE KINGDOMS: KOGURYO, PAEKCHE, AND SILLA (57 BCE to 668 CE) Historical Background Around 100 BCE, the Han Dynasty destroyed the ancient Kochosŏn kingdom of Korea. The Kochosŏn was a Bronze Age civilization that descended from Altaic speaking nomads that settled in Manchuria and Korea. Legend has it that Kochosŏn ’s first king, Tang’un is the founder of the Korean people.
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This essay was uploaded on 03/29/2016 for the course HISTORY AMES 41 taught by Professor Yung sun during the Spring '16 term at Dartmouth.

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Koreas.Dynamic.Role.In.East.Asia.Interaction.Innovation.And.Diffusion_Paoloni_Sholler_Velez.pdf

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