Iv lesson agenda o what is an astronaut o what is

This preview shows page 31 - 34 out of 72 pages.

IV.Lesson AgendaoWhat is an Astronaut?oWhat is NASA?oWhat is a Satellite?oCan you name a type of spaceship?oWhat is Outer Space?oRead new Vocabulary List.oOptional ActivityoFinish our Space Suits!LESSON PLAN 4: “Above the Sky: Where are the Sun and Moon?”Grade Level: 1stI.Science Standard:K-1 ES1BThe position of the Sun in the sky appears to change during theday.K-1 ES1CThe Moon can be seen sometimes during the day and sometimesduring the night.The Moon appears to have different shapes on differentdays.
We have textbook solutions for you!
/An-Introduction-to-Physical-Science-14th-Edition-9781305079137-273/
The document you are viewing contains questions related to this textbook.
Chapter 17 / Exercise 4
An Introduction to Physical Science
Shipman/Wilson
Expert Verified
II.Objective:Students will learn where the Sun, Earth, and Moon are in relationship to eachother.III.Lesson:“Welcome aboard our classroom spaceship today!Yesterday we talked aboutAstronauts, NASA, spaceships and outer space.Turn to your partner and talkabout one of the things you learned yesterday.Today we are going to talk andlearn about where the Sun is and where the Earth and Moon are in relation tothe Sun.The Sun is a star!A yellow star!It is located on Orion’s arm on theoutskirts of the Milky Way Galaxy.The Sun lies in the center of our SolarSystem.Just as the Earth orbits the Sun, the Sun orbits around the center ofthe Milky Way Galaxy, but it is much, much larger than our Solar system.The Earth is the third planet from the Sun in our Solar system.It is93,000,000 (million) miles from the Sun.(A great place for the Earth as aPeppercorn model.Use an 8” ball as the Sun, mark off 78 feet and set apeppercorn down, this represents the Earth, then set a grain of salt 2.4 inchesfrom the Earth, this represents the Moon.)Remind the kids that the Earthorbits the Sun in an almost circular pattern that takes 365 days to complete.The Moon is approximately 240,000 miles from Earth.It also has an almostcircular orbit around the Earth.It takes 29 days to orbit the Earth.How doesthis compare to distances we are used to.If you drove from here to Yakima(60 miles) it would take 4,000 trips to equal the distance to the Moon, and itwould take 1,550,000 trips to equal the distance to the Sun.How many yearsdoes each equal if you made a trip per day.To the Moon, it would take almost5.5 years, to the Sun it would take 2,123 years!That’s a long time and a greatdistance!IV.Lesson Agenda:oWhat is the Milky Way Galaxy?oWhat is Our Solar System?oWhat is an orbit?oReview new and old Vocabulary Words.oTexture DrawingLESSON PLAN 5: “Hello, Sun: Our Closest Star”Grade Level: 1stI.Goal:To discuss the details of the Sun’s size, its role as a heat and light provider,and other characteristics that affect Spaceship Earth.
II.Objective:The student will learn about just how big the Sun is in relationship to Earthand that it provides us with just the right amount of heat and light for Earth tobe the way it is.

Upload your study docs or become a

Course Hero member to access this document

Upload your study docs or become a

Course Hero member to access this document

End of preview. Want to read all 72 pages?

Upload your study docs or become a

Course Hero member to access this document

Term
Spring
Professor
Mr. Vega
Tags
We have textbook solutions for you!
The document you are viewing contains questions related to this textbook.
An Introduction to Physical Science
The document you are viewing contains questions related to this textbook.
Chapter 17 / Exercise 4
An Introduction to Physical Science
Shipman/Wilson
Expert Verified

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture