Being down and billing was behind for more than four

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being down and billing was behind for more than four days, causing theperformance to be above acceptable values during that time period.When all systems are running normal and no variances are occurring, allprocesses should be within the limits of the statistical control chart.
Reference:Krajewski, L. J., Malhotra, M. K., & Ritzman, L. P. (2015). OperationsManagement: Processes and Supply Chains (11 ed.). Boston, MA: Pearson.Thread:Q1­ Control ChartsPost:RE: Q1­ Control ChartsAuthor:Posted Date:January 5, 2016 11:37 AMStatus:PublishedJana,Well explained, thank you.You mentioned that if "5 or more observations are above or below the pbar ornominal value, it should be evaluated and remedial action should be taken". Doyou think that should be true regardless of the number of your observations?Let's say you have 2 cases: one with 10 samples and one with 1,000,000samples. Would the number of samples matter? Would the time of theoccurrence matter (for example, if we see some suspicious activitysporadic throughout the day, versus in one particular shift)? Why, or why not?Also, let's say we are evaluating the number of errors, and let's say 50% of oursamples fall below the lower limit. Should we be concerned?Class, anyone should feel free to answer these questions and explain yourrationale.Thank you,Professor SavicIvana Savic
2/21/2016Collection – MBA675­T303 Operations & Logistics in the (...3/28(Post is Read)Thread:Q1­ Control ChartsPost:RE: Q1­ Control ChartsAuthor:Posted Date:January 10, 2016 9:07 AMStatus:Published(Post is Read)Hi Jana,Nice job on this week’s post. You did a great job explaining that a process is outof control if the observation falls outside the upper and lower control limits. Youalso refer to page 106 where the book also explains that a process can be out ofcontrol if there is arunor pattern developing. I think that is where ProfessorSavic is going with her question. The book states that the typical rule is when 5or more observations are above or below the line but that assumes that thesampling is correct and that gathering the data is accurate. I was confused onthis with our homework problem on this topic. In problem 6 the observationswere within the limits but there did appear to be a pattern or run with the newsamples that we added. I stated that the process was in control but now I amthinking that the pattern may suggest that the process was out of control. I guesswe will find out once the homework solutions are made available.BillWilliam DempseyThread:Q1­ Control ChartsPost:RE: Q1­ Control ChartsAuthor:Posted Date:January 12, 2016 11:02 AMStatus:Published(Post is Read)Well explained. As long as you can rationally look at the data, withoutnecessarily having a specific rule to follow, you will do great. Sometimes allpoints may be within the limits, but the trend may indicate that something haschanged and the data is moving towards the upper limit, for example. Even thiswould be a cause to investigate.

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