Although people usually recover from binge drinking by sleeping it off alcohol

Although people usually recover from binge drinking

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“Although people usually recover from binge drinking by “sleeping it off,” alcohol poisoning is a medical emergency that requires immediate attention.” (pg.198). However, in the slight chance that the person is in a more serious condition, being scared to call for help can have serious consequences. Although many times it is not the lack of calling for help that has a dire ending. When people are hiding from being caught in the first place, like being in remote fields it limits the help that can be received. In the worst scenario, an ambulance wouldn’t be able to make it there in time. However, the costs of getting sent to a hospital can be the deciding factor for if a person receives help or not. In college, the procedure when someone is caught drinking is that they must be supervised and in most cases, if they are too drunk, medical help will be called. From the study conducted and written about by Williams they concluded that, “The average total charge, including hospital and physicians' charges, for the 24,010 visits was $383.29, the average direct cost was $166.28, the average total cost (direct
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Celine Mjällby 7 plus indirect) was $209.42, and the marginal cost was $87.68 (42 percent of the average cost).” This shows the incredibly high costs of a visit to the emergency room. They may not even perform any services but fees will still be applied. However, in general, the total cost of visits to the emergency room will end up being the summation of these services: supply costs, pharmacy costs, facility cost, laboratory, radiology and other ancillary costs and physicians cost. This can end up being a very large sum, depending on the situation (Williams). This isn’t the only reason young adults do not call for help. The cost of getting caught is something that seems to make young adults hide their drinking even more. The law becomes less effective, the more underground drinking is occurring. Beckner tells Stahl in an interview that “We'd find a party where we know there's underage drinking. We would seal the house. Surround the house with officers and we would write every single underage person coming out of that house. We wrote hundreds and hundreds of tickets those years. All we did is we pushed it further underground,” (CBS News). Now drinking is all about who can get drunk the fastest at home, so they can get to the location fast without having to drink in public. The location can be any dark, out of the way place in high school. Cases of college students lying unconscious on couches or being left to recover after a night out without anyone noticing or thinking that they have alcohol poisoning. This is what leads to avoidable mortalities in college due to alcohol. (CBS News) If the drinking age was 18, people would be able to call for help without having to risk anything. In the first place, they would not have to be drinking under the radar. CBS News interviewed the parents of an 18 year old who did pass away on the couch in his fraternity,
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