Was a french born swiss protestant theologian who

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was a French-born Swiss Protestant theologian who broke with the Roman Catholic Church (1533) and set forth the tenets of his theology, known today as Presbyterianism, in Institutes of the Christian Religion (1536). He agreed with most of Luther’s fundamental religious ideas, such as justification by faith. He made much more than Luther of the idea of predestination. He refused to allow government to lay down the laws for religion and thought it should be the other way around. John Knoxwas a Scottish religious reformer and founder of Scottish Presbyterianism. While living in exile(1553-1559) during the reign of Mary Queen of Scots, a Catholic, he came under the influence of John Calvin. Returning to Scotland (1559), Knox led the struggle for religious reform. With the drafting of the Confessions of Faith (1560), Protestantism became the established religion in Scotland.40. predestination, p. 81, 118: The doctrine that God has foreordained all things, especially that God has elected certain souls to eternal salvation. The divine decree foreordaining all souls to either salvation or damnation. The act of God foreordaining all things gone before and to come.41. The Institutes of the Christian Church, pp. 80-81, 118:Published by Calvin in 1536, in the Institutes people in all countries, if dissatisfied with the existing Roman church, could find cogent expression of universal propositions, which they could apply totheir own local circumstances as they required.42. Henry VIII, p. 83, 121-125:King of England (1509-1547) who succeeded his father, Henry VII. He was named “Defender of the Faith.” His divorce from Catherine ofAragon, his first wife, compelled him to break from the Catholic Church by the Act of Supremacy (1534).43. Elizabeth I, p. 84-87: Queen of England and Ireland (1558-1603) who succeeded the Catholic Mary I and reestablished Protestantism in England. Her reign was marked byseveral plots to overthrow her, the execution of Mary Queen of Scots (1587), the defeat of the Spanish Armada (1588), and domestic prosperity and literary achievement. nglandbecame Protestant.44. Act of Supremacy, p. 83, 123-124: Passed in 1534 by Parliament. Declared the English king to be the “Protector and Only Supreme Head of the Church and Clergy of England.” All subjects were required to take the oath of supremacy acknowledging the religious headship of Henry VIII and rejecting that of the pope.45. Counter Reformation, pp. 87-88, 125: A reform movement within the Roman Catholic Church that arose in 16th-century Europe in response to the Protestant Reformation. The reaction of the Roman Catholic Church to the Reformation reaffirmingthe veneration of saints and the authority of the Pope (to which Protestants objected); many leaders were Jesuits
46. The Council of Trent, pp. 88-90, 127-128:established the foundations of the Counter Reformation. Reaffirmed Catholic doctrine and reformed abuses in the church. (1545-1563)47. Pope Paul III, p. 90, 125:(1534-1549) First of the “reforming popes.” Insisted on the primacy of the papal office, but regarded this office as a moral and religious force. Authorized the Jesuits in 1540.48. Ignatius Loyola, p. 91, 126:

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