Items of correspondence newspapers transaction mail

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Items of correspondence Newspapers Transaction mail (bills, bank statements, etc.) Direct mail (addressed) Catalogues Magazines / periodicals Direct mail (un-addressed) Documents, parcels, letters Parcels Un-addressed printed matter Addressed printed matter Parcel mail
Development of competition in the European postal sector 17 date for full liberalisation set in directive 2002/39/EC. Also Norway, neighbouring the European Union, has taken this decision. A second group of countries have liberalised a relatively large segment of the mail market (up to circa 50% of the total addressed mail volume), in particular countries that have liberalised both the delivery of direct mail and outgoing cross border mail (Czech Republic, Germany for direct mail batches above 50 items, the Netherlands, Slovenia, and Spain). Particular cases are Denmark that has liberalised the delivery of items of correspondence and direct mail above 50 grams, Spain that has never included intra-city mail in the reserved area and the United Kingdom that has liberalised the delivery of bulk mail (more than 4,000 identical mail items in one batch). Some countries take an intermediate position by either liberalising direct mail (Italy), outgoing cross border mail (Austria, Belgium, France, Ireland, Lithuania), or incoming cross border mail (Slovakia). The other nine Member States have maintained a large reserved area of around 80% to more than 90% of the total volume of addressed mail and have not (apart from magazines and periodicals) liberalised the delivery of addressed mail below 100 grams for any of the postal products. From this group, Poland has a transitional regime reserving the delivery of mail below 350 grams to the national postal operator. General development of internal competition until date The market shares of the competitor postal operators in addressed mail delivery are still very small. The countries that have liberalised a relatively large part of the addressed mail segment show the highest market share for competitor postal operators: this market share is around 7-11% for Spain, 5-7% for Czech Republic, Estonia, the Netherlands, and Sweden, and 3-5% for Denmark and Germany. In the other countries there have not emerged competitor postal operators that are challenging the position of the national postal operator until date. In general it can be concluded that the liberalisation of addressed mail above 100 grams is insufficient for the development of any meaningful competition if this is not accompanied with the complete liberalisation of the delivery of certain postal products with substantial market volumes. The United Kingdom and France have a somewhat special position with regard to the development of competition. In both countries, competition in end-to-end services is very limited until date. France has maintained a relatively large part of addressed mail delivery in the reserved area but has liberalised the upstream market a long time ago. Mail consolidation has developed rather strongly here, with mail consolidators and large

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