Provided by Marriage and Family Therapists MFT psychologists social workers

Provided by marriage and family therapists mft

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Provided by Marriage and Family Therapists (MFT), psychologists, social workers, religious leader, etc. Why do they go Communication problems Lack of emotional affection Three types discussed in class What do they have in common All of the couple therapies stem from TBCT. They all had relatively the same success. What is unique about them Traditional Behavioral Couple Therapy (TBCT): Focuses on the behavioral exchanges of spouses Gives partners communication training Gives partners problem-solving training Cognitive-Behavioral Couple Therapy (CBCT): Addresses couples’ cognitive interpretations of each other’s behaviors. Helps couples interpret a partner’s behavior in positive light Integrative Behavioral Couple Therapy (IBCT): Focuses on direct change which often leads to resistance DEEP analysis (Differences, Emotion sensitivities, External stressors, Patterns of problematic interaction) Are they effective? TBCT: relationship satisfaction improved; works well for some couples but not others CBCT: performed better than TBCT; communication and cognition improved but wasn’t associated with relationship satisfaction outcome; effects seemed to fade fairly quickly
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IBCT: clinically significant improvement; about the same as TBCT. Social Support What is the paradox? Perceived social support is super great Enacted support (actual instances of support receipt) less so What, when, who, how, and why of social support What? Fulfillment of fundamental needs by others Weiss (1974) Attachment Social integration Reassurance of worth Guidance Reliable alliance Being needed When? The Timing of Social Support Communication of need Recognition by potential provider Provision (or not) of support Who? Characteristics of Providers and Receivers Gets more support: Extroverts Higher self-esteem Proved support to others Gives more support Secure attachment orientation Communal mindset
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Receive support from others How? Having Skills Invisible support: people are less anxious about invisible support Matching support: seeking out people with specific roles, giving the desired support (think nail in the head video) Reciprocal support: both provide and receive support Why? Motivation of Support Goals for one’s partner/friend/family Goals for one’s relationship Goals for the self Are there gender differences? NO Matching, Invisible, Reciprocity (Giving) Lights up reward regions in the brain Reduces mortality risk Wipes away any negative effects of receipt of support Divorce Decline in divorce rates (45% in US) —multiple ways of assessing Possible reasons for the decline Later age at marriage Reasons for marrying Fewer “shotgun” weddings Cohabitation If people break-up before getting married, that means there won’t be a divorce later Class differences College-educated (11% divorce rate in first 7 years) No college education (17% in first 7 years)
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Theories of marriage failure Disillusionment Model Couples start string and fade quickly Enduring Dynamics
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